The Best Scene in Last Night's X-Files Paid Homage to a Classic (and Banned) Episode

Tuesday, 09 February 2016 - 11:30AM
X-Files
Secret Wars
Tuesday, 09 February 2016 - 11:30AM
The Best Scene in Last Night's X-Files Paid Homage to a Classic (and Banned) Episode
Last night's episode of The X-Files wasn't terrible, but was a disappointing comedown after last week's mostly excellent "Mulder and Scully Meet the Were-Monster." There were a few affecting moments between Mulder and Scully, some great acting from Gillian Anderson, and a somewhat creepy (if underbaked) monster-of-the-week, but the family melodrama and relatively insubstantial monster hunt didn't mesh together at all, and the episode was ultimately less than the sum of its parts. So needless to say, it didn't come close to living up to its namesake, the classic fourth season episode, "Home," but it did pay homage to it, which led to the best scene in the episode.

In "Home Again," which was scripted by "Home" writer Glen Morgan, the golem-like monster with a stupid name (Band-Aid Nose Man? Really?) breaks into a selfish, privileged suburban woman's home in order to stop her from preventing the homeless to be relocated to a hospital near a school. The golem finds her and gruesomely rips her apart in a tense, darkly lit, stormy scene jarringly set to "Downtown" by Dolly Parton. This closely evoked the most iconic scene from "Home," in which a group of genetic mutants beat the innocent sheriff and his wife to death with baseball bats, set to Johnny Mathis' cheerful ballad "Wonderful, Wonderful" (or a soundalike cover, as Mathis refused to let them use his song after reading the script).



"Home" is one of the most controversial episodes of the original series (not least as a result of this brutal scene). There was no explicitly graphic violence or sex, but the disturbing nature of the above attack and the implied incest was enough for the show's first-ever TV-MA rating and a subsequent ban of the episode. Fox famously never replayed the episode, barring one special Halloween showing three years later. Glen Morgan previously stated that he wanted to write a sequel to the episode back when he was writing Millennium, but Fox executives told him the Peacock family could never appear on television again. So although "Home Again" necessarily wasn't a direct sequel to "Home," that scene of gruesome violence set to an innocuous pop song made this a (far inferior, but still appreciated) spiritual sequel.
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