The 100's Luna Is a Less Annoying Version of Morgan from The Walking Dead

Friday, 06 May 2016 - 2:53PM
The 100
The Walking Dead
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Friday, 06 May 2016 - 2:53PM
The 100's Luna Is a Less Annoying Version of Morgan from The Walking Dead
 After a season of build-up, we finally met Luna, the last Nightblood from Lexa's conclave, last week. And after "Red Sky at Morning," in which we got a sense of her pacifist philosophies and saw her in action, we can safely conclude that she's basically Morgan from The Walking Dead. (Except not nearly as annoying.)

In the latest episode, Clarke, Bellamy, and Octavia tried to convince Luna to take the A.L.I.E. 2.0 chip, so she can become Commander and help them defeat A.L.I.E. 1.0. Luna immediately refused, because she didn't want to be involved in violence anymore if she could help it. She's a staunch pacifist, telling Clarke that "the path of violence is a choice," and telling Clarke that she's no different from anyone else who will do anything for their people. "How many lives will be taken for these lives that I save?" she asks Clarke, which really gets to the heart of Clarke's moral ambiguity. (And Luna doesn't even know about Mount Weather.)

Sometimes when inherently violent shows add pacifist characters, it becomes extremely irritating, because they're not so much taking a principled stance as they are simply not accepting the reality of their situations. Morgan on The Walking Dead, for example, ends up being a drain on the proceedings because he can't accept that, in a post-apocalyptic world, sometimes violence is necessary. It's not noble to keep your hands clean, if it only means letting the innocent die or forcing others to do your dirty work for you.

Luckily, this isn't the case for Luna, and not just because she's a bad-ass in her own right (so is Morgan, after all). I was worried that it would be when Clarke delivered the line, "When the choice is fight or die, there is no choice," but instead the episode highlighted that Clarke often convinces herself that she doesn't have a choice in order to justify her actions. At Mount Weather, she was in a terrible situation, and she didn't have a good choice, but she did have a choice. Maybe one could argue that actual, direct self-defense isn't much of a choice, but Clarke wasn't defending herself when she attacked Luna and tried to chip her against her will. The show went to great lengths to establish that Clarke did, in fact, have a choice in that situation (when even Bellamy is saying "You don't have to do this," you should probably take a good hard look at your decisions), but she chose to perpetrate that immoral act of violence anyway. 

Clarke is still more sympathetic than straight-up dictators like Pike, because at least she's shown to feel guilt and have doubts, but she still has a bad habit of taking others' destinies into her own hands, and to commit violence when it's not strictly necessary. Luna demonstrated this when she proved that she is, in fact, willing to kill--when she absolutely has to. After living so long in the post-apocalyptic world, t's understandable that Clarke, Octavia, and co. would have lost sight of when violence is necessary and when it's simply pragmatic, but it's nice to have a legitimate foil for their Rick Grimes-esque tendencies.
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