Toby Kebbell Says We'll Never Get to See Josh Trank's "Great" Original Fantastic Four Vision

Wednesday, 08 June 2016 - 4:57AM
Marvel
Fantastic Four
Wednesday, 08 June 2016 - 4:57AM
Toby Kebbell Says We'll Never Get to See Josh Trank's "Great" Original Fantastic Four Vision
Josh Trank's Fantastic Four stole a lot of headlines last year, but unfortunately for the film and everyone involved with it, few of those headlines were positive. The comicbook adaptation was a bust in just about every conceivable way. The critics bashed it – its 9% rating on Rotten Tomatoes is a testament to this fact– and a shockingly poor word of mouth reaction led to Trank's film only taking just over $56 million at the domestic box office, which was only a few million more than classics such as Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance and the 1997 Spawn movie.

As ugly as Fantastic Four's performance was, though, it was nothing compared to what happened in its wake. From reports of Miles Teller and Trank almost coming to blows on the set, to Trank's insistence that it was studio interference that was responsible for turning his project into the hot mess that was unleashed upon the public, much mud was slung and many souls were searched among the Fantastic Four cast and crew.

Now, almost a year after its initial release one of Fantastic Four's key cast members has once again fanned the flames of those studio interference rumors by insisting that Trank's original vision was actually pretty great.

Toby Kebbell played Fantastic Four's Doctor Doom, one of Marvel's greatest villains and a pivotal part of the Fantastic Four franchise. In an interview over at The Daily Beast, Kebbell opens up on the Fantastic Four shoot, saying that we'll never get to see what Trank originally intended to give the fans.

Opening quote
"I tell you, the honest truth is [Trank] did cut a great film that you'll never see. That is a shame. A much darker version, and you'll never see it."
Closing quote

With Doom's legendary status both at Marvel and within the Fantastic Four storyline, it felt a bit odd that we really didn't see much of him. Well, if it felt odd for us, imagine how odd it felt for the chap who was actually playing him. During the interview, Kebbell details a 'Birth of Doom' scene that was removed from the final cut, and he seems to suggest that this scene's removal was only scraping the surface of what was changed between the original shoot and the final release.

Opening quote
"I missed the press tour forPlanet of the Apes because I was lying under rubble, slowly rising out of the ashes to be Doctor Doom. Never made it to the film! There are always frustrations with these tent poles," he shrugged. "But it generally comes from the script changing, sadly enough. But I'm very proud of my work. I'm also just as heartbroken as the fans are."
Closing quote

Of course, scenes getting cut are part and parcel of getting a movie to release, but Kebbell also revealed that there were a number of Doom scenes weren't actually shot with him in the Doom suit. 

Opening quote
"Unfortunately. I played Doom in three points: Walking down a corridor, killing the doctor and getting into the time machine, and lying on the bench. They were the only times I played Doom. Everything else was some other guy, on some other day… doing some other thing. I was infuriated that he was allowed to limp like that!"
Closing quote

If all this is true, and we don't really see why it wouldn't be, it's really a great shame that we'll never be able to compare and contrast between the two different cuts. Despite Fantastic Four being such a jumble, it felt like there was a solid vision in there somewhere. Simon Kinberg recently stated that Trank's original vision was too dark, which most likely led to the lengthy reshoots and disjointed nature of the final product.

Opening quote
"I think the biggest takeaway for me [is that] the tone of the movie, while really interesting and ambitious, ran counter to the DNA of the source material," Kinberg told Happy Sad Confused. I think the source material of Fantastic Four is bright, optimistic, poppy in tone. There's a sort of plucky spirit to those characters, and we made a darker, sort of body-horror kind of version of Fantastic Four, which again as I say it now sounds really interesting and cerebrally ambitious, but isn't necessarily Fantastic Four."
Closing quote

Then again, it's not like that bright, optimistic tone did wonders for the Fantastic Four movies of the early 2000's, is it?
Science Fiction
Comic Book Movies
Marvel
Fantastic Four

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