'Rogue One' Releases a New 'Creature Featurette' to Spotlight Its New Aliens

Monday, 05 December 2016 - 1:02PM
Star Wars
Star Wars: Rogue One
Monday, 05 December 2016 - 1:02PM
'Rogue One' Releases a New 'Creature Featurette' to Spotlight Its New Aliens
The moment Luke and Obi-Wan Kenobi walk into the Mos Eisley cantina and see the menagerie of weird and shady creatures drinking and carousing, you get a taste of the galaxy: there's werewolf-looking aliens, tiny bat-headed people, and Figrin D'an and the Modal Nodes, showing that even across a galaxy's worth of biodiversity, catchy pseudo-jazz has universal appeal.

Like A New Hope, Rogue One has a surprising amount of weird and wonderful alien races—most already in action-figure form—though most of them are a bit more heavily armed than the cantina crew. This is a rebellion, after all. And after watching the new featurette released today, we're excited to see them all in action. Here's the clip:



Bit-player aliens like Figrin D'an and Bib Fortuna (the creepy vampire alien guy from Jabba's Palace) spice up the Star Wars universe by lending the galaxy some exotic flavor and hinting that that there's a whole universe out there where weird lobster people like the Mon Calamari have their own histories, homeworlds, and culture. The most important thing, though, is making sure these aliens are visually believable—in lieu of long "Let me tell you the story of my people" scenes, we usually rely on the appearance of Star Wars' aliens to tell us everything we need to know about them: the evil bounty hunter Bossk is a scary, slimy reptile, the lovable but strong Chewbacca is furry but huge, and the wise and humorous Yoda is small and harmless—but contains hidden strength.

Despite the prequels introducing a whole slew of new alien creatures and races in CGI, including Sebulba, Nute Gunray, Dexter Jettster, and He Who Must Not Be Named (Jar Jar Binks), the new movies have generally opted to go back to primarily using props, costumes, and animatronics. Part of this is ostensibly to distance themselves from the green-screen madness that brought down George Lucas (who even went on the set and told Edwards to use 'more computers') and to capture the realism you can't always get from CG, but another reason may be more practical: it's generally easier to be a convincing actor if the character you're talking to is in a full Wookiee outfit, not a green morph suit with a stuffed head mounted on a helmet, shouting "AAAAUUUURRRGGGGHHH".

Because that's just unsettling.

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story hits US theaters on December 16th.
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Star Wars
Star Wars: Rogue One