'Logan' Review: Wolverine's Last Ride Is the Perfect Mix of Bloody, Brutal, and Melancholy

Friday, 17 February 2017 - 4:32PM
Comic Book Movies
Marvel
Logan
Friday, 17 February 2017 - 4:32PM
'Logan' Review: Wolverine's Last Ride Is the Perfect Mix of Bloody, Brutal, and Melancholy
Image credit: 20th Century Fox, Marvel
Logan is a movie about spit, blood, and beards. The amount of people that are gored, impaled, beheaded, ripped apart, shot, and tortured is stunning, as is the sheer amount of wounds, gashes, explosions, and stolen vehicles Logan, Professor X, and Laura leave in their wake-all of it stacks up until it feels like the trio are sloshing around in blood up to their ankles. Most action movies would shrug off the collateral damage and focus on bigger explosions and car chases, but Logan never forgets about the blood on its hands-and doesn't let you forget, either.

Fans cheered when it was announced that Logan would be R-rated-just like Deadpool, the R-rating signified that the movie would give up its shot at massive PG-13 box office profits in favor of telling a story that needed to be a bit grittier, a bit more real. Jackman himself even took a pay cut to make sure it all happened. Watching the movie at a press screening yesterday, it's clear that they pushed that R-rating as far as they could take it, to the point that I asked myself Did they really do that? multiple times. An incident with a high-speed car crash, some spiked farm machinery, and a shotgun sticks out in my mind.


The point is that if you watch lightsaber fights in the Star Wars prequels or the Spartans lunging around the battlefield in 300, you take a certain comfort in knowing that movie violence is always choreographed. It's not real-it's all just set pieces designed to look badass. In Logan, all of that evaporates in the first 10 minutes, when Logan eats a shotgun blast to the chest at point blank range and rips up a bunch of Mexican gang members in a frenzy. There are several scenes where Logan or Laura just seem like they're desperately slashing away with their claws as fast as they can, unchoreographed and brutal. You realize that this is life or death, and no one is safe.


One moment in particular sums up the movie: there's a scene when Wolverine wakes up snarling from a nightmare to find Laura staring at him in that wide-eyed way that resembles Eleven from Stranger Things. She's spent her short life in a research facility, being conditioned to kill. To comfort Logan, she offers that she has nightmares sometimes, too-ones where people hurt her. Logan sighs and says that his nightmares are about him hurting people. And that's really it-Logan and Laura are an older and younger version of each other, trapped in a cycle of violence that never seems to end, and the question is whether either of them is strong enough to break out of it.

But what makes it ironic is that we wanted this—we wanted to see a bunch of super-powered people locked in elaborate fights to the death, like when Wolverine jumped over that helicopter from a motorcycle and sliced the blades off while doing a flip. There's no spectacle like that in Logan, but there's something even more satisfying in watching the whole movie turn into a beautiful, bloody tragedy. There are so many human moments between Xavier, Laura, and Logan that we wish there was more. All things considered, we can't think of a more bittersweet or or fitting ending to the saga of the Wolverine.
 
Snikt.

Logan
hits theaters March 3rd, 2017.

[Image credits: Ben Rothstein, 20th Century Fox]
Science Fiction
Sci-Fi Movies
Comic Book Movies
Marvel
Logan
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