Michael Crichton's Final Novel 'Micro' Gets a Director for Film Adaptation

Sunday, 09 April 2017 - 7:50PM
Sci-Fi Books
Sunday, 09 April 2017 - 7:50PM
Michael Crichton's Final Novel 'Micro' Gets a Director for Film Adaptation
HarperCollins
Late sci-fi author Michael Crichton was no stranger to film versions of his books, having seen Jurassic Park, The Lost World, The Andromeda Strain, Rising Sun, Congo, etc. all hit big screens. But besides spin-offs like Jurassic World or reboots of his old movies (read: HBO's Westworld), it's been a long time since we've seen a direct adaptation of a Crichton novel.

But a film version of his final, posthumous book Micro is finally going forward after being bought by Amblin Entertainment, owned by Steven Spielberg (who directed Jurassic Park and is a fan of Crichton's). According to Deadline, director Joachim Rønning is now in talks to helm the project, after co-directing the upcoming mouthful of a title Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales. The script for Micro has already been written by Darren Lemke, who also wrote Goosebumps and Shrek Forever After (but don't let that deter you).

Micro was only partially finished when Crichton died in 2008, so he shares an author credit with Richard Preston, who finished writing the book that finally came out in 2011. The novel follows a bunch of grad students who accept what seems like their dream jobs at a mysterious biotech company in Hawaii, only to be shrunken down and thrown into the rain forest to fend for themselves. If your first thought was "this sounds like if Honey, I Shrunk The Kids was a serious movie," then you've got the right idea.

While that may sound like a silly movie pitch at first glance, a film about shrunken scientists fighting their way through the wilderness while an evil tech company pursues them could easily end up being a great thriller. While not all of Michael Crichton's movies have been hits, enough have that we're choosing to be cautiously optimistic right now. Just because a serious Honey, I Shrunk The Kids hasn't been done yet, that doesn't mean it can't be done. Plus, the success of Ant-Man has audiences suitably prepared for another shrinking movie.

via GIPHY



Via: AV Club
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