Matt Reeves Is Officially Throwing Out Ben Affleck's Script for 'The Batman'

Thursday, 13 July 2017 - 1:10PM
Comic Book Movies
DC Comics
Batman
Yes
Thursday, 13 July 2017 - 1:10PM
Matt Reeves Is Officially Throwing Out Ben Affleck's Script for 'The Batman'
Image credit: Warner Bros.
Matt Reeves has the daunting (almost Sisyphean) task of making a Batman movie that lives up to fan expectations after Ben Affleck's departure from the director's seat. It's surprising, then, that Matt Reeves has officially announced that he's thrown out the entire script for The Batman, which Ben Affleck had written with DC President Geoff Johns, starting over from scratch on a new movie idea. In a recent interview on MTV's "Happy Sad, Confused" podcast, one of the hosts asked Reeves "Are you working off the existing script that Bannon...Geoff did?" Reeves replied "No, it's a new story. It's just starting again. I'm excited about it. I think it's going to be really cool."

Reeves is making a risky, but probably wise decision here. In order to make the best movie possible (and, considering the level of fan hype surrounding this project, The Batman really has to be the best movie possible), Reeves needs the creative freedom to do something that he's invested in.

We don't know exactly what was discussed when Reeves negotiated with DC over the terms of the movie, but considering that the director walked way at one point in the process, it's safe to say that in order to get him back, DC had to make some serious compromises. In other circumstances, a director might not have been given the creative control necessary to be able to ditch a plan that was already in the works—not least one that was set in motion by the studio's president and the movie's leading man.



The fact that starting all over again is even an option suggests that Reeves is being given space to do his own thing, which considering DC's propensity for micromanaging its movies, bodes well for the future of The Batman. Wonder Woman turned out great in large part because director Patty Jenkins was left alone to do her own thing, so it's nice to hear that Reeves is in a position to build his own movie from the ground up.

It also suggests that DC is invested in making this an excellent movie. The studio is willing to take a hit on wasted time and effort that went into the pre-production for the first version of this movie, so allowing Reeves to start again sends out the message that in this instance, DC is more interested in making a great movie than having it ready for a prompt theatrical release.

The only person who stands to be particularly upset about this move (aside from Joe Manganiello, who was very excited about playing Deathstroke but who might not get the chance now) is Ben Affleck, who's seen his own vision for the movie relegated to the cutting room floor. This, though, may also work well for the movie: the grumpier Affleck is during filming, the more convincing his Batman scowl will become. Affleck's Dark Knight is a very angry, dark version of the character, so the more annoyed he is at Matt Reeves' directorial choices, the better.

Besides, if The Batman doesn't turn out to be completely, utterly perfect, Affleck can maintain that his version of the movie would have been way better, and nobody will be able to argue with him.
Science Fiction
Sci-Fi Movies
Comic Book Movies
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