'Blade Runner 2049' Officially Receives an R-Rating

Wednesday, 09 August 2017 - 7:45PM
Blade Runner
Blade Runner 2049
Wednesday, 09 August 2017 - 7:45PM
'Blade Runner 2049' Officially Receives an R-Rating
Warner Bros.
The R-rating continues its current rise in popularity, as it's now been officially confirmed that Denis Villeneuve's upcoming Blade Runner 2049 will carry such a rating,

The rating is specifically for content described as "violence, some sexuality, nudity, and language" - in other words, everything you love about the original Blade Runner.

R-rated franchise films have been on the rise lately. In retrospect, it feels like a shame that the Robocop reboot got made when it did. Taking the blood, gore, and genital-shooting out of that reboot robbed the formula of its basic premise; the idea of hyper-violent action attached to a palpably ridiculous central concept which almost features as a self-parody, and which doesn't carry the same weight when neutered for a PG-13 crowd.

The good news, though, is that with movies like Deadpool and Logan proving the box office appeal of a movie that's tailored specifically to an older, more mature (and in some ways far less mature) audience means that the new Robocop may be one of the very final toned-down, family friendly adaptations of an inherently grown up premise.

The idea of the PG-13 Blade Runner movie would have excited precisely nobody - even the thirteen-year-olds around the world would prefer the movie to be more graphic and violent, for when they inevitably watch it on Netflix in a couple of years' time. The whole point of the movie is that it's difficult to watch - there's scenes of very intense violence, like that shrieking, flailing, half-naked replicant that's gunned down in brutal fashion, as well as wider dark themes of mortality, abuse, and substance abuse that don't play well in front of kids.



These ideas are hard-wired into what makes Blade Runner so unique as a piece of speculative fiction - the movie takes the dusty "used universe" aesthetic that made Star Wars stand out from the crowd, and amps it up to eleven, showing what life would really be like in such a society. Sure, there are no triple-breasted women, but there is more than enough in that first film that would make your mother blush, and that's important for the art of the piece.

It's fantastic, then, that Blade Runner 2049 is being made in a post-Deadpool world, where movies are more often allowed to be as violent and graphic as they need to be in order to get their point across. After all, this won't appeal to anyone who doesn't already idolize the original - nothing, from the director to the lead actors to the plot, will be quite as influential on ticket sales as the desire among fans to see the continuation of such a rare and innovative slice of sci-fi history.

From the looks of it, Villeneuve has been given all the creative freedom he's needed in order to make this movie faithful to the original in terms of tone and style. The hard R-rating is another reflection of this, and it should hopefully result in a movie that, unlike Robocop or countless other PG-13 reboots, won't feel like a crucial part of the formula is missing in order to give the movie a broader appeal among families and younger children.

Yes sir, Blade Runner 2049 is the perfect sequel, at least on paper. Whether Villeneuve can actually deliver something which lives up to the original in the eyes of its fans remains to be seen (and is very unlikely given how deified this movie has become among certain circles within the sci-fi fandom), but at least from this perspective, we can be assured that the movie certainly won't lack for authentic horrifying blood, guts, nudity, and profanity.

Probably all at the same time, if this movie is anything like the original.



Blade Runner 2049 comes out October 6, 2017.

Via: Collider
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