The Very First Reactions to Christopher Nolan's Interstellar

Wednesday, 15 October 2014 - 1:19PM
Interstellar
Reviews
Wednesday, 15 October 2014 - 1:19PM
The Very First Reactions to Christopher Nolan's Interstellar

There are no reviews for Christopher Nolan's Interstellar on Rotten Tomatoes, but that doesn't mean no one has seen it. It's been relatively hush-hush, but a few filmmakers and journalists have snuck a peek at the full film, and so far the praise has been effusive. Although the earliest reviews usually tend to be the most positive, it still seems safe to say that the film's place in the Oscar race is safe for now. 

 

Some secondhand buzz from Jordan Hoffman of Film.com:

 

And from Chris Lee, writer for Entertainment Weekly, who gushed that it was a cross between Steven Spielberg and Stanley Kubrick:

 

Filmmaker Edgar Wright, formerly of Ant-Man, thinks it's "incredible":

 

Filmmaker Iain Marcks replied:

 

 

Cinematographer Will McCrab called it a "masterpiece":

 

Oscar-nominated director Paul Thomas Anderson called it "beautiful," and a testament to the value of using film rather than digital:

 

"Christopher Nolan is at the front lines of [film], I have to say. He's made a beautiful film, if anybody gets out to see Interstellar when it comes out," he joked. "I'm just trying to put in the good word, he's a decent filmmaker; you probably haven't heard about this one."

 

 

But the most detailed review comes from Jeff Jensen of Entertainment Weekly: "Christopher Nolan boldly goes into outer space with his most visually spectacular and emotionally resonant movie yet. We can say that because we've seen it."

 

"In the near future of the film, Earth is dying, ravaged by blight and environmental ruin. And yet, Interstellar deliberately veers away from dystopia chic with its depiction of optimistic, adventurous heroism reminiscent of director Philip Kaufmann's adaptation of The Right Stuff, which... influenced the tone of Nolan's movie.

 

"Informed by the work and theories of renowned astrophysicist Kip Thorne, Interstellar is more akin to the speculative sci-fi of 2001: A Space Odyssey than space opera fantasy like Star Wars, while still remaining accessible pop entertainment.

 

"Nolan challenged himself and his team to fill Interstellar with imagery designed to inspire awe in the audience, not to mention a little terror. Dust storms. Tidal waves. Wormholes. A tiny, fragile spaceship juxtaposed against the monstrous gas planet of Saturn. Everything in the hush-hush final act."

 

And finally, some high, if weird, praise: "[Interstellar features] the most unusual robot to grace the screen in years (meet the fall's breakout star: a mini-monolith of metamorphic Jenga blocks named TARS)."

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