The X-Files Co-Creator Claims the Mythology 'Holds Together,' Defends the Final Seasons

Wednesday, 25 March 2015 - 11:20AM
X-Files
Wednesday, 25 March 2015 - 11:20AM
The X-Files Co-Creator Claims the Mythology 'Holds Together,' Defends the Final Seasons
Fans were ecstatic when it was officially announced yesterday that Fox is reviving The X-Files, but it was sort of an unspoken agreement that the reboot would look more like the acclaimed early seasons than the comparatively despised latter seasons. But co-creator Chris Carter, who will return for the reboot, claims that people are too hard on the final seasons of The X-Files, and that the mythology may be confusing, but it holds up on re-watch.

When asked in a recent interview with Hitfix whether he thought the mythology started off strong but then "folded in on itself," Carter said, "No. I think some of the best work was done in seasons 6, 7, 8 and 9. I would point to those seasons, and there are episodes in those seasons that I think are among the best."

And when pressed about the quality of the mythology in particular, he claimed that it makes sense, especially upon re-watching the entire show from start to finish. "When you set out to do a show, you don't imagine it's going to go nine years. And all of a sudden, you have to start looking at it in new ways. The mythology was complex, and I think complexity equals, in people's minds, confusing. I don't accept, necessarily, this idea that it folded in on itself. I think if you go back and watch it from beginning to end - I've actually talked to people who have done that recently, and they say, 'It all holds up. It works together.' Whether you like where it went after season 5, you can cavil with me there. But I think all of the choices were still lovingly made, and I would back every one of them."

I'm a huge fan of The X-Files, and I'm also personally biased in favor of serialization, so I always liked the mythology more than most people. I thought it held up for the most part (although it went off the rails a little near the end). What's more difficult to defend, in my opinion, is the overall quality of the series after David Duchovny left, and especially after Gillian Anderson scaled back to part time. Scully was often the show's saving grace, so her presence helped, but the new characters were little more than ciphers, and not nearly developed enough to serve as anything resembling replacements for the original duo. (But the new series will have both Anderson and Duchovny, so these problems are moot going forward.) And as for whether the mythology holds up on re-watch, we'll have to let you know when we do our inevitable re-watch before the reboot starts. 
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