NBC Orders The Office-Style Workplace Comedy Set in the DC Comics Universe

Friday, 14 August 2015 - 2:19PM
DC Comics
Friday, 14 August 2015 - 2:19PM
NBC Orders The Office-Style Workplace Comedy Set in the DC Comics Universe
DC Comics has very nearly taken over television, and it shows no sign of stopping. In addition to Arrow, The Flash, Gotham, and iZombie (and Constantine, RIP), the next year or so will see the premieres of Supergirl, Legends of Tomorrow, Preacher, and Blackbirds. Now, we can add one more to that list, as NBC has just ordered the DC Comics show "Powerless" to pilot. 

But Powerless is significantly different from any of those other projects, as it is not based on any specific DC Comics properties. Instead, it focuses on all of the normal people in the DC Universe who have to cope with a world filled with superheroes and villains, and all the drama slash city-leveling that entails. Specifically, the half-hour workplace comedy follows drone workers at an insurance company, and their upset over their own mediocrity.

In other words, it's The Office, but with DC heroes popping in every once in a while. There's no word on which DC characters will appear in the show, but according to initial reports, major properties like Batman and Superman will not make an appearance. They're probably too cool for it.

According to Deadline, the official synopsis reads:

Opening quote
Based on characters from DC Comics, Powerless is a workplace comedy set at one of the worst insurance companies in America - with the twist being that it also takes place in the universe of DC Comics. The show is about the reality of working life for a normal, powerless person in a world of superheroes and villains... The focus of the series is on the ordinary, "power-less" folk working at the insurance company who often envy the men and women outside their window who make headlines with their supernatural powers.
Closing quote


I actually love this idea, as the comedic premise of The Office works even better in a comics universe. Instead of Jim comparing himself to sports writers, and Pam comparing herself to artists, and Dwight comparing himself to Stalin, they were all comparing themselves to actual superheroes. 

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