Nanobots, Red Eyes, and Superhuman Abilities: What Will Humans Look Like in 1,000 Years?

Friday, 23 October 2015 - 11:14AM
Genetic Engineering
Friday, 23 October 2015 - 11:14AM
Nanobots, Red Eyes, and Superhuman Abilities: What Will Humans Look Like in 1,000 Years?
What will humans look like in 1,000 years? A new video by ASAP Science, sponsored by National Geographic, attempts to answer this question, and apparently in the future, humans will be part-machine superhuman mutants:



According to the video, some of the changes that the human race will undergo over upcoming centuries are the result of natural selection; the human race has evolved to be approximately 10cm taller over the last 150 years, so that trend will likely continue. And as global warming increases, we will likely evolve to have darker skin, as people with darker skin are less likely to suffer from UV radiation damage. Similarly, we may all become taller and thinner, as this is the optimal body surface area-to-volume ratio for coping with increased heat.

Other changes require scientific advancements in fields such as nanotechnology. The global lifespan has increased by almost 20 years in the last 65 years, mostly as a result of medical advancement, and that number will likely continue to increase with certain medical innovations. ASAP Science claims that in 1,000 years, we will likely embrace a philosophy of transhumanism and integrate nanobots into our bodies, which will work in tandem with our immune systems to improve our health and lifespan even more.

Other changes may occur as a result of natural genetic mutation; ASAP Science claims that mutations may cause a new eye color, or abilities that would be described as "superhuman" in the modern day. For example, there is one man on record with the ability to digest almost anything, including metal and glass, as a result of a genetic mutation. There's also a mutation that leads to a condition called tetrachromacy, which allows people to see 100 times more colors than everyone else

But these mutations will only persist if there is some kind of evolutionary advantage, which is where genetic engineering comes in. 1,000 years isn't very long for natural evolution to occur, but genetic engineering could speed up the process considerably, so many changes to the human race will likely occur because humans find them desirable (whether they are actually advantageous to our survival or not). So while that may mean the elimination of many diseases on a "designer baby" level, we will also likely have modifications that make us more conventionally attractive, like larger eyes and symmetrical facial features.

And while these genetic modifications may make us stronger, smarter, and better-looking in the short run, there could also be dire consequences. The lack of genetic diversity could lead to a single disease that has the capability to wipe out the entire human race (presumably because we all have the same vulnerabilities). But on the other hand, we could also achieve digital immortality by scanning our brains atom by atom, so it may be a moot point.
Science
Technology
Genetic Engineering

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