New Study Suggests That the Human Brain is Able to Handle Teleportation

Saturday, 05 March 2016 - 4:53PM
Neuroscience
Technology
Saturday, 05 March 2016 - 4:53PM
New Study Suggests That the Human Brain is Able to Handle Teleportation
New research by the University of California, Davis Center for Neuroscience suggests that the human brain is prepared for the concept of teleportation.

This is quite a statement, as, of course, teleportation technology hasn't even been developed as of yet. But new studies have indeed shown that the brain can not only comprehend how far one would travel during teleportation, but also how fast the process occurs as well.

This new information is partly based off the fact that the brain seemingly gives off rhythmic oscillations during the processes of navigation and remembrance. This rhythmic firing is thought to either be the product of the learning process or sensory input - scientists are still currently unsure of which.

Anyway, this discovery was made during a study that involved individuals suffering from a severe type of epilepsy. They placed electrodes on the patients' brains so that they would be able to tell when seizure activity began, and then told the volunteers to essentially play a video game that involved navigating up a virtual street. This involved moving to certain points where teleporters were located. Upon hitting them, the screen would turn black, and the study showed that during this process, the rhythmic oscillations in the brain indicated that those participating in the study were able to process how far and how fast they were moving.

Of course, since this wasn't actual teleportation, there's still more research that would have to be done in order to know for sure how exactly the human mind would handle the process of being teleported. Yet, from the information gained from this study in particular, it would seem that the current obstacles involved in the viability of teleportation exist elsewhere than the human mind.
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