NASA Releases Nearly 3 Million Amazing Images of Earth from Space

Monday, 04 April 2016 - 3:46PM
Space
Earth
Space Imagery
Monday, 04 April 2016 - 3:46PM
NASA Releases Nearly 3 Million Amazing Images of Earth from Space
For the last sixteen years, the Japanese remote sensing instrument Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) has been taking pictures of Earth aboard the NASA Terra spacecraft. It has built up a huge database, imaging 99% of our planet, and now for the first time, everyone has access to a decade-and-a-half of data. NASA announced on April 1 (but not as a joke) that they were releasing 2.95 million pictures of Earth from space to the public, of everything from major cities to surreal geological structures to land use diagrams. Here are some of the most amazing photos taken by ASTER since 1999:

A shot of Venice, Italy, and ASTER's most popular image:

Earth from Space


Alluvial fan in China, a triangular geological feature made of alluvium, a mixture of gravel, sand, and silt:

Earth from Space

The McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica, possibly the most Mars-like landscape on Earth:

Earth from Space

The tallest sand dunes in the world in the Namib-Naukluft National Park of Namibia:

Earth from Space

Richat Structure, Oudane, Mauritania:


Earth from Space

Paris, France: 

Earth from Space

False-color image of the Anti-Atlas Mountains in Morocco, with limestone in yellow, sandstone in orange, gypsum rocks in green, and granite in blue:

Earth from Space

The perfectly circular intrusion of Kondyor Massif in Russia, formed from molten magma crystallizing underneath the Earth and then rising to the surface:

Earth from Space

Mount Etna erupts with hot lava in Italy:

Earth from Space

The U.S.-Mexico border, with farms in red:

Earth from Space

The ruins of Machu Picchu in Peru:

Earth from Space

The Iraq Sulfur Fire, the largest human-made release of sulfur dioxide ever recorded:

Earth from Space

Baghdad, Iraq, where the plumes are burning pools of oil from pipelines:

Earth from Space

The Dead Sea, the lowest point on Earth at 418 meters below sea level, located on the border between Jordan and Israel:

Earth from Space

2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, Utah:

Earth from Space
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