Watch: NASA's Most Detailed Look at Pluto's Surface Yet

Friday, 27 May 2016 - 2:32PM
Space
Space Imagery
Solar System
Friday, 27 May 2016 - 2:32PM
Watch: NASA's Most Detailed Look at Pluto's Surface Yet
Last July, New Horizons made its closest approach to Pluto, providing a wealth of new information about our former ninth planet. It also gave us a cornucopia of close-up images of the dwarf planet, which NASA has now strung together to make the "most detailed view of Pluto's terrain you'll see for a very long time":


The above video, made of all the highest-resolution images from New Horizons' close approach on July 14, traverses the planet's entire hemisphere that faced the spacecraft. The images have a resolution of about 260 feet per pixel, and a width of about 55 miles at its northern end to about 45 miles at its southern point. 

The pictures, which were taken by New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) approximately 9,850 miles from Pluto's surface, are currently (and probably for a very, very long time, until a space agency funds another close approach to Pluto) our best look at the topography and geology of the elusive dwarf planet. These images and other data have yielded many groundbreaking revelations about Pluto, including the presence of "flowing ice" and signs of past rivers and lakes of liquid nitrogen.
Science
NASA
Space
Space Imagery
Solar System

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