New Evidence Persuades Scientists That the Universe Is a 'Hologram'

Monday, 30 January 2017 - 4:21PM
Physics
Monday, 30 January 2017 - 4:21PM
New Evidence Persuades Scientists That the Universe Is a 'Hologram'
Image Credit: Paul McFadden
Though the 3-D TV may be dead, understanding how 3D works might be the key to understanding the origins of our universe. According to a study published through the University of Southhampton in the UK, along with several other universities, there is growing evidence that our universe might be a vast, expanding hologram.

Many of the details in this study remain hard to prove, but the basics can be broken down as such: imagine that everything humans experience in our "3-D" reality (which is actually composed of length, width, depth, and duration) is really a projection originating from a 2-D surface, similar to how an audience experiences a 3-D film or TV show. Though the screen is flat, it projects a 3-D image to the senses. The key difference, of course, is that what is being 'projected' in our hologram universe can be touched and experienced. In this theory, all of the data exists in the 2-D space first and is then projected forward to the 3-D reality we all understand as the observable universe.

Much of the research came forth after it was found that a great deal of data appeared to be hidden in the microscopic waves that were left behind after the Big Bang (which are often referred to as "white noise"). Thanks to advances in both telescopes and sensors, scientists have been able to make some extremely complex comparisons between what they found in the white noise data and quantum field theory. 

There is a renewed hope in the scientific community that this discovery might be another step toward reconciling our current knowledge about the universe with Einstein's theory of relativity, which has been used to map out the large-scale activity of the universe but has often fallen apart when applied to its earliest development at a quantum level. Should this hologram model hold true, it could help to fill in the gaps of Einstein's revolutionary theory and bring us a step closer to understanding the origins of our existence, not just in terms of biology, but of matter, time and space altogether.


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