Interstellar: Fictional Version of Real-Life Technologies

Tuesday, 27 May 2014 - 4:46PM
Technology
Tuesday, 27 May 2014 - 4:46PM
Interstellar: Fictional Version of Real-Life Technologies

With the recent release of the first trailer for Christopher Nolan's "Interstellar," fans are gearing up for its November 7 premiere. 

 

In preparation for the big day, here are a few cool things we've noticed in the trailer, and their real-world counterparts. 

 

Credit:Warner Brothers

 

The movie's central plot revolves around a >wormhole.  A wormhole is a hypothetical phenomenon that connects two distant locations in space-time. Among other things, they would be able to be used to travel vast distances in space in a short amount of time. Wormholes have been prominently featured in many classic science fiction works, notably "Star Trek," "Star Wars," "Stargate SG-1," and "Babylon 5." However, since the theory behind wormholes is a very complex, abstract concept that even astrophysicists have difficulty understanding, wormholes are most often used in very genre-heavy science fiction, rather than mainstream science fiction. Until now, that is.

 

Credit:Warner Brothers

 

Another interesting tidbit in the trailer is the sneak peek of the spacecraft. This particular model is a Torus-shaped spacecraft, which simulates Earth-like gravity (we've seen it before in Stanley Kubrick's 2001:A Space Odyssey) The real-world version of the craft was actually designed to be a space habitat, capable of housing 10-140 thousand permanent residents. Perhaps this is a clue as to how the characters escape Earth (but I guess we'll just have to wait and see).

 

Credit:Warner Brothers

 

The movie also features cryogenic pods, which are fictional pieces of equipment that can freeze a human, and put them into hyper-sleep.These "suspended animation pods" are a science fiction staple, appearing in films such as Prometheus (2012), and Alien (1979) They operate based on the very real principle that when a person's core body temperature is dropped to below freezing, it helps preserve tissues and organs during complicated surgeries when the heart must be stopped. Modern science has continued to make advances in this direction; human trials for suspended animation during surgeries begin this month

 

In Interstellar, science fiction and modern scientific discoveries come together to create what should be an awesome science fiction blockbuster. 

 

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