3-D Printed Robotic Birds Pass Bird Version of Turing Test

Wednesday, 03 September 2014 - 2:08PM
Artificial Intelligence
Robotics
Weird Science
Wednesday, 03 September 2014 - 2:08PM
3-D Printed Robotic Birds Pass Bird Version of Turing Test

According to Alan Turing's test for artificial intelligence, an AI can be considered truly intelligent when it has the ability to pass as a human. Now, robotic birds called Robirds have decreased populations of birds of prey in unwanted areas by passing for real birds.

 

The Robirds have the appearance of real birds (either falcons or eagles), they are approximately the same weight, and they use wing propulsion to fly, just like real birds. They are engineered exactly the same way as flesh-and-blood birds, but they are robots. They are manufactured by the company Clear Flight Solutions, whose company motto is "We make birds."

 

[Credit: Clear Flight Solutions]

 

[Credit: Clear Flight Solutions]

 

Birds can cause a lot of problems in fields such as agriculture, waste management, but most of all aviation. When birds are in the wrong place at the wrong time around airports, they can put passenger airplanes at risk. As a result, the makers of Robirds are attempting to decrease the bird population around unwanted areas by making these birds believe that other birds of prey have infringed upon their territory. And by all accounts, it's working; the real birds' instincts are triggered by the Robirds and they tend to avoid these robots' "hunting grounds." Trials are still underway, but early results have been promising, with the bird population decreasing by 75% at one landfill. 

 

According to the company: "Birds learn to avoid the active hunting grounds of a bird of prey, with bird numbers dropping by as much as 50 percent or more, depending on the location and surroundings. Because the Robirds trigger the instinct of birds, there are no chances of habituation in the long term. There are currently no other means available in battling the nuisance of birds, that have such high success rates as the Robird."

Science
Technology
Artificial Intelligence
Robotics
Weird Science

Load Comments