Astrobiologist Claims to Have Proof that Humans Descended from Extraterrestrials

Wednesday, 08 October 2014 - 3:04PM
Astrobiology
Alien Life
Wednesday, 08 October 2014 - 3:04PM
Astrobiologist Claims to Have Proof that Humans Descended from Extraterrestrials

University of Sheffield astrobiologist Milton Wainwright not only claims to have proof of extraterrestrial life, but also an explanation for the origin of all human life. 

 

Last year, Wainwright and his team launched a balloon into Earth's stratosphere, 27 km high. It was equipped with many sterile slides, one which captured an organism while in space. It's a carbon and oxygen particle that is approximately 10 microns long and is colloquially called the "dragon particle" for its peculiar shape. Wainwright claimed that because it is a carbon-based particle, it cannot be cosmic volcanic dust.

 

[Credit: UoB]

 

"This is clearly a biology entity... It is certainly unusual and seems to be like nothing found on Earth," he told The Daily Express. He claims that this conclusion is partially based on the particles' pristine condition, devoid of pollen, grass, pollution, soil, volcanic dust, or any other contaminants that one would expect in a particle of earthly origin. "This, plus the fact that some of the biological material samples by the team produce impact craters when they hit the sampler, confirms their space origin."

 

Wainwright goes so far as to claim that the dragon particle confirms a version of the "ancient astronaut" hypothesis, in which all human life originates from extraterrestrial organisms. This theory has been around for centuries, but in modern times has mostly been relegated to the realm of pseudoscience and science fiction, including last summer's Alien prequel, Prometheus. "This is the tipping point towards science proving that life is continually coming to Earth from space, and that it did so in the first instance."

 

He also thought there was a possibility that the dragon particle is related to the organisms found on the exterior of the ISS last month. The prevailing theory involves the plankton being swept up to the ISS by atmospheric currents, although even those who hold this hypothesis admit that it would be unprecedented for atmospheric currents to carry anything quite that far from Earth. "They may be the same, or similar to the ones we have found," said Wainwright. "In both cases they will be intercepted on their journey from space to Earth and- not as some unthinking critics have suggested- lazily drifting up to such extreme heights from Earth...The ISS is more than 200 miles from earth, there is no way that anything of this size can get to that height from Earth."

 

Although Wainwright may very well be correct that there are alternative explanations for the ISS organisms, his own claims have drawn criticisms as well. NASA astrobiologist Chris McKay didn't discount Wainwright's extraterrestrial theory, but countered that he lacked sufficient evidence to make a definitive claim. "The jump to the conclusion that it is alien life is a big jump and would require quite extraordinary proof. (The usual Sagan saying: extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.)" He went on to qualify an example of "extraordinary evidence" that would convince him of Wainwright's assertions: "If they were able to show that it was composed of all D amino acids (proteins in Earth life are made of L amino acids), that would be pretty convincing to me. So some sort of biochemical indication that it does not share Earth biochemistry. If it does indeed share Earth biochemistry, proving that it is of alien origin is probably impossible."

 

Although it seems unlikely to be true, confirmation of Wainwright's theory would have tremendous ripple effects in the scientific community. Wainwright said, "If our findings are true they will forever alter our view of life, and particularly evolution on Earth, and we will need to rewrite of our biology textbooks."

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