Brian Cox and Gravity VFX Team to Recreate the Universe Using Augmented Reality Technology

Friday, 21 November 2014 - 3:17PM
Technology
Virtual Reality
Friday, 21 November 2014 - 3:17PM
Brian Cox and Gravity VFX Team to Recreate the Universe Using Augmented Reality Technology

Popular physicist Brian Cox will join forces with the visual effects team behind the dazzling 2013 film Gravity in order to create an "augmented reality" history of the universe, in which images will not only be in 3-D, but will be projected directly onto the viewers' eyes.

 

Making-of video about the amazing effects in Gravity:

 

The project, called The Age of Starlight, aims to address "the deepest possible questions" about the origins of the universe, according to Cox. It will use cutting-edge technology from the relatively new system Magic Leap, which will purportedly allow the viewer to see the computer-generated images as though they are actually there. Magic Leap inventor Rony Abovitz has previously said that the technology goes "beyond the current perception of mobile computing, augmented reality, and virtual reality. We are transcending all three."

 

Cox, who recently saw a prototype of the technology being used for the project, agreed that it's groundbreaking: "It's the premiere of a technology that allows you to put digital images into your field of vision directly. It is going to be transformative technology, there's no doubt about that." 

 

Brian Cox takes a photograph of the spiral galaxy Andromeda, seeing the light it emitted 2.5 million years ago in Wonders of the Universe:

 

Cox, who is known for presenting television documentaries such as BBC's Human Universe, Wonders of Life, and Wonders of the Universe, clarified that The Age of Starlight is primarily intended to be an artistic experience, rather than an educational one, one that he hopes will elicit an emotional response. "The experience will disturb audiences and leave them off-balance. I want people to stagger out and have to have a sit-down for a long time before they go home. Don't forget, it's an art installation... It's supposed to be beyond what you would get in a documentary. It's not a science lecture, it's not a science documentary. It's a piece of art."

 

Brian Cox explains what happens as you near a black hole using Zambia's spectacular Victoria Falls in Wonders of the Universe:

 

The show will premiere as part of the Manchester International Festival next July.

Science
Space
Technology
Virtual Reality

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