UK Scientists Find Evidence that Aliens May Have Seeded Life on Earth

Friday, 13 February 2015 - 4:39PM
Astrobiology
Alien Life
Earth
Friday, 13 February 2015 - 4:39PM
UK Scientists Find Evidence that Aliens May Have Seeded Life on Earth

Did extraterrestrials deliberately seed the first life on Earth? Astrobiologists from the University of Buckingham have discovered a mysterious object that may have been sent from an intelligent race of aliens to propagate life on our planet.

 

The tiny metal globe, pictured above, is of unknown origin, and is eerily made of both organic and inorganic materials: "It is a ball about the width of a human hair, which has filamentous life on the outside and a gooey biological material oozing from its centre," said team leader Milton Wainwright.

 

The strange, seemingly engineered composition of the object led the researchers to conclude that it could be evidence that life as we know it was deliberately engineered and sent to Earth by an intelligent alien species, or "directed panspermia." 

 

"One theory is it was sent to Earth by some unknown civilization in order to continue seeding the planet with life," Wainwright said.

 

According to the panspermia hypothesis, life came to exist on Earth as a result of contamination from extraterrestrial structures such as comets, meteors, and asteroids. Panspermia has many supporters in the scientific community, and is generally thought to be somewhat plausible, but is more often conceived as an accident, a natural result of these celestial objects coming into contact with many different planets. The idea of directed panspermia is a little more fringe.

 

Even Wainwright admitted that this conclusion sounds outlandish: "This seeming piece of science fiction, called 'directed panspermia' would probably not be taken seriously by any scientist were it not for the fact that it was very seriously suggested by the Nobel Prize winner of DNA fame, Sir Francis Crick." Sir Francis Crick was one of the discoverers of the structure of DNA in 1953, for which he won the Nobel Prize, and he also put forth a directed panspermia hypothesis in 1973.

 

And furthermore, there is concrete evidence that the object came from space, if not necessarily that it was artificially engineered: "On hitting the stratosphere sampler the sphere made an impact crater, a minute version of the huge impact crater on Earth caused by the asteroid said to have killed off the dinosaurs," said Wainwright. "This impact crater proves that the sphere was incoming to Earth from space, an organism coming from Earth would not be travelling fast enough when it fell back to Earth to cause such damage."

 

He concedes, however, that like most of the coolest scientific theories, directed panspermia may well be unverifiable: "Unless of course we can find details of the civilization that is supposed to have sent it in this respect it is probably an unprovable theory."

Science
Space
Astrobiology
Alien Life
Earth