6 Groundbreaking Science Events Coming This March

Tuesday, 03 March 2015 - 10:56AM
Space
SpaceX
Astronomy
Tuesday, 03 March 2015 - 10:56AM
6 Groundbreaking Science Events Coming This March

February was an exciting month for science, seeing the first pictures of Pluto's small moons, the one-way mission to Mars narrowing down the shortlist to 100 finalists, the first direct evidence of wave-particle duality of light, and a bonafide human head transplant proposal. And although we obviously can't say for sure which scientific events of this coming month will ultimately be most significant, there are a few exciting landmarks that are scheduled ahead of time. Here are the biggest science stories to look out for in March 2015:

 

Dawn reaches Ceres

 

Science Events

[Credit: NASA]

 

This Friday, March 6, NASA's Dawn spacecraft will finally make its approach to dwarf planet Ceres after launching seven years ago. It will be the first spacecraft to orbit two extraterrestrial objects.

 

Nearly complete solar eclipse in Britain

 

Science Events

[Credit: NASA]

 

On the morning of March 20, parts of Britain will be plunged into near-total darkness as they witness the most complete solar eclipse in fifteen years.

 

MESSENGER ends its mission

 

Science Events

[Credit: NASA]

 

NASA's MESSENGER, finishing up a historic journey to Mercury, is expected to end its decade-long mission this month.

 

SpaceX Dragon Inflight Abort

 

Science Events

[Credit: SpaceX]

 

Sometime this month, SpaceX's Dragon is scheduled to abort from Falcon 9 in order to demonstrate its escape system before landing off the coast of California.

 

Astronauts begin first full year on ISS

 

Science Events

[Credit: NASA]

 

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko will begin a one-year spaceflight, living in space longer than any other astronauts in history. 

 

The Large Hadron Collider turns back on

 

Science Events

[Credit: CERN]

 

The Large Hadron Collider, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, is set to be turned on again sometime this month after a two-year break. It is expected to make many discoveries about our unseen world, possibly even the direct detection of dark matter.

Science
NASA
Space
SpaceX
Astronomy

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