NASA Asks You to Vote for the Most Spectacular Hubble Images

Thursday, 05 March 2015 - 3:01PM
Space
Astronomy
Space Imagery
Thursday, 05 March 2015 - 3:01PM
NASA Asks You to Vote for the Most Spectacular Hubble Images

Hubble Mania 2015 has begun! As NASA's version of March Madness, as well as a celebration of Hubble's 25th anniversary in April, the space agency is having a contest which pits all the most famous Hubble images against each other leading up to one final smackdown.

 

The contest is in bracket format, with the first round of thirty-two images ending on March 11, and four rounds of voting (sixteen, quarters, semis, and finals) after that. You can vote here for your favorites, as the first round of voting is now open.

 

Most of the rounds are fairly easy to predict, and many of them aren't even close. This face-off between a galaxy and a supernova remnant is the closest contest by a landslide, as it's the only race that's down to less than a hundred votes:

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

While this contest between the comet ISON and a planetary nebula is the most absurdly mismatched:

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

The main lesson to take from the initial voting is that planets will always lose, and nebulae will always win:

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Seriously, anything going up against a nebula essentially isn't a fair fight. Clearly, we need more contests like this one, in which a nebula faces off against another nebula:

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

But since there's an exception to every rule, the Sombrero Galaxy is the only picture to topple a nebula, and by a landslide:

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Galaxies also tend to win against anything else, and the more galaxies there are, the better:

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Hubble

[Credit: NASA]

 

Make sure to fill out your bracket, and check back on March 11 for round two!

Science
NASA
Space
Astronomy
Space Imagery

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