Miniature Black Holes at the Large Hadron Collider Could Confirm Parallel Universes and Gravity's Rainbow

Wednesday, 18 March 2015 - 5:07PM
Astrophysics
Physics
Black Holes
Wednesday, 18 March 2015 - 5:07PM
Miniature Black Holes at the Large Hadron Collider Could Confirm Parallel Universes and Gravity's Rainbow
Scientists have long been theorizing that our universe is only one of many, that there are many "bubble universes" that run parallel to each other. But since they are parallel, by nature they never interact with our own universe, and as a result, the theory has often been criticized as unfalsifiable. Now, a new study may indicate that the detection of miniature black holes at the Large Hadron Collider would confirm that there are multiple universes that exist in other dimensions.

The key to this theory, according to the authors, is that their conception of "parallel universes" is distinct from the "multiverse theory": "Normally, when people think of the multiverse, they think of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, where every possibility is actualized," co-author Mir Faizal told Phys.org. "This cannot be tested and so it is philosophy and not science. This is not what we mean by parallel universes. What we mean is real universes in extra dimensions. As gravity can flow out of our universe into the extra dimensions, such a model can be tested by the detection of mini black holes at the LHC. We have calculated the energy at which we expect to detect these mini black holes in gravity's rainbow [a new theory]. If we do detect mini black holes at this energy, then we will know that both gravity's rainbow and extra dimensions are correct."

According to our current knowledge of black holes, the production of the phenomena would require much more energy than the LHC could possibly harness in a four-dimensional universe. But if more than four dimensions exist, then the energy requirements for producing a black hole would be lowered, as scientists hypothesize that some of the gravity in our universe would flow into those other dimensions. 

Thus far, miniature black holes have never been detected at the LHC, which would seem to contradict the authors' theory. But they believe that previous attempts at detection miscalculated the energies at which these black holes would exist because they didn't take gravity's rainbow into account. Gravity's rainbow is a groundbreaking new theory in theoretical physics that may unify gravity with quantum mechanics. According to gravity's rainbow, space does not exist below a certain minimum length, and time does not exist below a certain minimum time interval. And when taken into account in the calculations involving miniature black holes, it predicts that it would take a little more energy than previous studies indicated.

If their theory turned out to be correct, then the detection of these black holes would not only support parallel universes and extra dimensions (which would, by extension, support superstring theory, but would also confirm gravity's rainbow. And since gravity's rainbow resolves the information paradox, the biggest mystery inherent to the theory of black holes would then be solved.

"If mini black holes are detected at the LHC at the predicted energies, not only will it prove the existence of extra dimensions and by extension parallel universes, but it will also solve the famous information paradox in black holes," said co-author Farag Ali.
Science
Science News
Astrophysics
Physics
Black Holes
Large Hadron Collider Black Holes Could Confirm Parallel Universes

Load Comments