Bill Nye and Planetary Society Claim that NASA Could Send Manned Mission to Mars by the 2030's

Friday, 03 April 2015 - 2:25PM
Space
Mars
Friday, 03 April 2015 - 2:25PM
Bill Nye and Planetary Society Claim that NASA Could Send Manned Mission to Mars by the 2030's
Mars One's daring plan to get to Mars by the early 2020's may very well be unfeasible, but that doesn't mean that we won't put astronauts on Mars in the near future. At a recent workshop held by the Planetary Society, Bill Nye "The Science Guy" and other experts reportedly came to a consensus on a realistic plan for NASA to send a manned mission to Mars by the 2030's.

"Getting humans to Mars is far more complex than getting to Earth's Moon," Nye said in a statement from the Planetary Society"But space exploration brings out the best in us. By reaching consensus on the right set of missions, we can send humans to Mars without breaking the bank."

According to their cost-effective plan, NASA should gain public support and further funding by sending an orbital mission in 2033, which would then allow them to send a manned mission to the Red PLanet by the late 2030's. "We believe we now have an example of a long term, cost constrained, executable humans to Mars program," said Professor Scott Hubbard of Stanford University.

The experts claim that, form a technological standpoint, we are almost ready to go to Mars right now. The conversation surrounding travel to Mars has shifted in recent years, and the biggest hurdles are no longer scientific, but financial and political. "I'm not saying the technical challenges aren't extraordinary and very, very difficult," said Nye. "And it's going to take a lot of thoughtful engineers and scientists giving it a lot of thought and science. But the real problem is politics - or the real opportunity is politics."

Hubbard tended to agree with this assessment: "In the past, when the question of humans to Mars came up, I would typically cite a number of major hurdles: biomedical, launch systems and so fort. And as of today, I think that those risks have either been reduced or you know how to minimize them, and so I am at the same place that John [Logsdon] and Bill [Nye] [are], that I think the issue now... political will."

Via Space.com.
Science
NASA
Space
Mars

Load Comments