This Real-Life Jetpack Could Help Emergency Workers Save Lives

Tuesday, 16 June 2015 - 3:07PM
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Tuesday, 16 June 2015 - 3:07PM
This Real-Life Jetpack Could Help Emergency Workers Save Lives
The future transportation vehicle of EMT and first responders is here. Meet the jetpack that could one day help first responders save lives.

Previously confined to the pages of science fiction novels, the jetpack is now becoming a reality thanks to Martin Aircraft, a New Zealand based company that has been working on the development of a functional jetpack since the 1980's. A fully-functioning model of the Martin Jetpack was seen flying at speeds of 45 M.P.H at this year's Paris air show, and the company believe the equipment, which is expected to retail for $200,000, will be available for use sometime next year. "Were moving to a commercial product so we can release it in the second half of 2016," says C.E.O Peter Coker.



The jetpack itself is probably a bit bigger than you would imagine, but it still manages to maintain a futuristic sleekness that wouldn't feel out of place in an episode of Johnny Quest. It's powered by duct fans driven by an engine power plant containing V4 two stroke engines, and contains a quick-deploy parachute for emergency situations.

It's able to navigate all kinds of terrain, from rubble to mountains to roads, and can be controlled by the pilot, or by remote control. Martin promises that the technology has been made very easy to use, so any potential pilot will be able to obtain a license relatively easily. While there have been many attempts at creating a truly viable jetpack, what really sets Martin Aircraft's product apart from others is that it is currently classed as a light aircraft, making regulatory hurdles much easier to overcome. 



The vision for the Martin Jetpack is as a disaster relief aid; Coker told NBC "We've developed this for our first responders, fire, police, natural disaster, and recovery." Since it is small and lightweight, it can reach places that are inaccessible to helicopters and cars, thus making it easier to provide relief to disaster areas.


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