Scientist Claims the World Could Fall Into a Black Hole and We Wouldn't Even Notice

Wednesday, 17 June 2015 - 1:26PM
Weird Science
Physics
Black Holes
Wednesday, 17 June 2015 - 1:26PM
Scientist Claims the World Could Fall Into a Black Hole and We Wouldn't Even Notice
Recent theories of black holes have depicted them as killer vacuums that send hapless matter to a fiery grave. If the world fell into a black hole, we can only assume that we would all be destroyed instantly. But according to a new theory (or really, an updated old theory), if the Earth fell into a black hole, it would create a nearly perfect hologram, and we might not even notice the difference.

Professor Somir Mathur of Ohio State University was instrumental in devising a conception of a black hole as a collection of cosmic strings, which led to the adorably named "fuzzball" theory. Other physicists expanded on this hypothesis to come up with the "firewall" theory, or the notion that black holes have "firewalls" around their event horizons, or borders made of high-energy particles, that disintegrate any matter that passes through them. 

Mathur has also been expanding on his theory, but came to a different conclusion about the fate of matter that passes through a black hole. His updated fuzzball theory, detailed in a new paper, states that the surface of a black hole doesn't destroy matter, but rather makes a near-perfect copy of it in the form of a hologram, which would then continue to exist and would be functionally exactly the same. 

The paper was just published this week and doesn't appear to have been peer-reviewed, but if this theory turns out to be true, it would have enormous implications. One of the tenets of string theory leads to the conclusion that our universe is actually a two-dimensional hologram that exists in many more dimensions than we can perceive, and "fuzzy" black holes would support this hypothesis. 

"If the surface of a black hole is a firewall, then the idea of the universe as a hologram has to be wrong," Mathur said. 

According to Mathur, the firewall side of the fuzzball-firewall debate is not necessarily wrong, but working from different assumptions. Both sides acknowledge that a perfect copy is physically impossible, but firewall physicists don't accept that black holes can be themselves imperfect and therefore create an imperfect hologram. "There's no such thing as a perfect black hole, because every black hole is different," said Mathur in an OSU statement

"It's a simple question, really," said Mathur. "Do you accept the idea of imperfection, or do you not?"

Via Popular Science
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Scientist Claim the World Could Fall Into a Black Hole Without Us Knowing

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