Chris Hadfield to Make Free Educational YouTube Series: 'It's Not Rocket Science'

Tuesday, 21 July 2015 - 11:43AM
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Tuesday, 21 July 2015 - 11:43AM
Chris Hadfield to Make Free Educational YouTube Series: 'It's Not Rocket Science'
NASA astronaut Chris Hadfield is about to become our newest Science Guy, as he is creating a new YouTube series that will boil down complex scientific concepts in succinct, comedic ways. The show will be called It's Not Rocket Science, and although the videos will be free when they come out, the astronaut and co. are looking for your help to fund the production of "the best science comedy videos you've ever seen."



Hadfield will be working with multimedia artists Dan Turner and Tracy King, as well as his son, Evan, who is perhaps best known for making this amazing video:



Hadfield will narrate and star (in an animated way), while Evan will write and produce. The official summary of the project reads:

Opening quote
Much like plucky superheroes, we've come together to save the world. Maybe not the whole world, granted. But a little bit of it. We're creating what we believe will be the best science comedy animated series of all time. Our goal isn't just to deliver facts, but to explain the stories that make progress interesting. If we want to make a better future, we need better explanations of our present. We need people to understand where the ship is sailing if they're ever going to tend the sails.
Closing quote


Like Hadfield said, it seems to be a prime method of giving back to the community, as a basic understanding of scientific concepts is incredibly important, especially for children. And it's just a bonus if it's actually entertaining; Hadfield has always been a likable presence, and it seems that the show already has a healthy sense of humor. Evan writes of his father, "He once commanded a space station, which after his moustache is his second most interesting feature." 

You can donate here, with donations ranging from as little as two dollars per video (there will be ten Patreon-produced videos coming in the fall, so a total of twenty dollars), to $150 or more. It seems that they've already reached their initial goal of $1,000 per video, but if they reach a further goal of $5,000, they will be able to offer donors prizes like shirts, prints, and other show-specific gear.
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Chris Hadfield: Free Educational Series: 'It's Not Rocket Science'

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