You Can Now Go on a Kenyan Safari and Help Save Elephants With Google Street View

Tuesday, 15 September 2015 - 12:10PM
Earth
Tuesday, 15 September 2015 - 12:10PM
You Can Now Go on a Kenyan Safari and Help Save Elephants With Google Street View
Going on an African safari sits right at the top of many people's bucket list, but with iconic animals such as elephants and rhinos in serious danger of extinction, time is running out for those who wish to fulfil their dreams of seeing these magnificent beasts in the wild. Africa is currently in the grips of an horrific poaching crisis that has seen tens of thousands of elephants and rhinos killed for their tusks and horns in the last 5 years. This crisis is having a devastating effect on animal populations across Africa, and conservation organizations are drastically underfunded as they try to battle a relentless flow of poachers looking  

In an attempt to increase public awareness of this crisis Google has partnered with the Samburu National Reserve in Kenya and Save the Elephants, giving people around the world a chance to get to know hundreds of individual elephants and other wild animals all from the comfort of their own home.



Using their their Google street view technology, technicians logged over 800,000 hours of GPS tracking, which with the help of experts from Samburu and Save the Elephants, led to the identification of no fewer than 1,450 elephants. The interactive street view system allows you to trundle seamlessly through the Kenyan bush, spotting everything from elephants to giraffes and zebras. It's this up close and personal look at these magnificent animals that David Daballen, Head of Field Operations at Save the Elephants, hopes will encourage the masses to take action against the horrors currently unfolding throughout the continent.

Opening quote
Today, a visit to Samburu is a chance not only to see these magnificent creatures in their natural habitat, but also discover a uniquely beautiful landscape where people's live are interwoven with the landscape's wildlife. It's my honour to invite you on a journey to my homeland with Street View in Google Maps...

...I hope this glimpse into life in Samburu has inspired you to learn more about elephants' plight and how you can help. Samburu is my home and is full of life. To ensure it remains that way, please consider supporting the research of Save the Elephants, making a donation to the anti-poaching efforts of Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, or fostering an orphaned elephant at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. After exploring in Street View, come and see us here in Kenya in person-we'd love to have you!
Closing quote




Conservation experts all agree that the losses in elephant populations caused by poaching are simply not sustainable. Between 2010 and 2015, it's estimated that over 100,000 elephants were killed by poachers looking to capitalize on the booming ivory trade overseas. One only has to look at the plight of the Northern White Rhino to see what fate could become of the African elephant if this ugly trend continues. There is now just one male Northern White Rhino left alive in the world today, and he like his two remaining female counterparts are now under a 24 hour guard in a private Kenyan reserve.

Take the time to get to know these wonderful animals and spread the word about the ongoing efforts to keep them safe.
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