The Walking Dead 'JSS': Is Enid One of the Wolves?

Monday, 19 October 2015 - 9:49AM
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Monday, 19 October 2015 - 9:49AM
The Walking Dead 'JSS': Is Enid One of the Wolves?
Last night, on an excellent, unbearably tense episode of The Walking Dead, the Wolves rampaged through Alexandria, massacring its citizens (though, predictably, no one whose names we can remember). But the question remains: how did they get in? We can't be sure, but there were several hints that Enid was one of the Wolves, and that she may have been working with Ron to sneak them in.

First, she disappeared directly after the Wolves leave, which is immediately suspicious. We know that Enid is a hardened survivalist, but she's still a young girl, and it would be deeply stupid for her to leave the safety of Alexandria to live by herself. It's much more likely that she was leaving to join the Wolves, especially since she revealed to Carl that she was leaving during the Wolves' attack. If she were planning on leaving on her own, then why would she choose to say goodbye to Carl during an attack on the town? And even more damning, when the two of them are guarding Judith, she says,

Opening quote
"They're just people. This place is too big to protect. There are too many blindspots. That's how we were able to-"
Closing quote


Carl, of course, is too enamored with her to notice that she's about to confess to colluding with the Wolves. And judging from the beginning of the episode, it's likely that she's been a Wolf all along. In the highly unsettling cold open, Enid watches her parents get eaten by walkers, and then ventures into the dangerous world on her own, marking all of her haunts with the letters, "JSS." My first thought was that she wanted people to follow the trail of messages back to her, so she could find a community to live in. But we don't see that happen with Alexandrians; rather, the end of the cold open shows Enid entering Alexandria by herself, a strange look of guilty resolve on her face. We know from the end of the episode that "JSS" means "Just survive, somehow," so it makes sense that Enid would have wanted to survive at all costs. 



This is all circumstantial evidence, of course, but there are several mysterious parts of this episode that would be explained by this theory. First, Carl sees Enid and Ron talking and hugging at the beginning of the episode, which seems apropos of nothing. It's too sinister a scene to be explained by simple jealousy on Carl's part, especially since the viewer is not invested enough in his relationship with Enid to care all that much. Many have speculated that the "A" on Carol's railing was marking her for death, and we know that Sam was running around, marking everyone with the letter "A." It seems unlikely that Sam was involved, as he seems innocent enough, but it was established in this episode that Ron is angry at Rick for his father's death, so he could have taken his stamp in order to indicate which houses held Rickettes. Although, Melissa McBride stated to Comicbook.com that Carol was upset to see the "A" precisely because it was a symbol of Sam's innocence, so it's possible that the two are unconnected.

Ron and Sam's involvement is much more ambiguous, but Enid's betrayal of the Alexandrians seems much less debatable. This revelation, while extremely depressing, is The Walking Dead at its best. The show is singularly concerned with the idea that in order to fight monsters, you have to become a monster (note that Carol has difficulty washing the blood "W" off of her forehead), and the cold open made it clear that Enid wasn't evil, she was only trying to survive. Her insistence to Carl that the Wolves are "just people" is indicative of the show's extremely bleak view of human nature, which is always there, but has never been more apparent than this episode, in which a sad 14-year-old girl orchestrates the massacre of an entire town.
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