"Flash" Producer Says "Some Things Are Broken Forever" After Flashpoint

Tuesday, 04 October 2016 - 2:39PM
DC Comics
The Flash
Tuesday, 04 October 2016 - 2:39PM
"Flash" Producer Says "Some Things Are Broken Forever" After Flashpoint
< >
We've already gotten some amazing behind-the-scenes looks at Season 3 ofThe Flash, but tonight is the big night. Not only because The Flash returns to TV, but because this episode will be the infamous "Flashpoint," where we get to see the aftermath of Barry going back in time to save his mother. And now, thanks to EW, we've gotten a couple sneak peeks at how "Flashpoint" is going to change the show (and maybe the CW's superhero shared universe) forever.

First off, we've expressed incredulity that the whole "Flashpoint" thing was going to be over in one episode. Here's what Andrew Kreisberg, one of the producers of The Flash, has to say about whether the whole thing will be resolved in one episode:

Opening quote
Well, it does and it doesn't. It will be resolved, but there will be consequences that last throughout the season, and quite frankly, last throughout the series. That's one of the things that we're attempting to do is have the pitfalls of time travel be long-lasting and that some things can be fixed, and then some things are broken forever.
Closing quote


So Kreisberg seems to be hinting that Barry's little jaunt back in time may only be for one episode, but the effects will last much longer. Especially chilling is that last line, though—what gets broken forever? Barry's relationship with another character? His memories? His timeline? His heart? The way Kreisberg describes the new timeline, Barry gets a chance to taste the happiness he never had:

Opening quote
When we see Barry Allen, to start the season, he's actually in a happy place, which is [somewhere] you don't always see Barry Allen in. He's now living in a world where his mother is alive and he's taking it as, "I've finally got my reward for all of the suffering that I've gone through. This is my prize." And he begins to see that the cost of him getting his happy ending might be too much to bear.
Closing quote


Much of that "cost" has to do with his friends, who have become wholly different people in the new timeline (where Barry saves his mother). Essentially, Barry trades his friends for a happy family life and must meet their new versions like they're strangers:

Opening quote
...I don't want to get too much into the specifics of it, because that's part of the fun journey of going through this journey to Oz with these characters. As you come upon them, the audience is discovering as they watch it what's different and what's the same. Suffice it to say, in some ways, Barry has sacrificed his relationship with Joe for his relationship with his birth family and that's one of the challenges that Barry has to overcome in the episode.
Closing quote


Worse still, Barry's actions have turned some of his former friends and co-heroes into worse people, including Cisco: 

Opening quote
Because these characters are so strongly defined by the actors that portray them, that's why it's so much fun to get to see different versions of them. A selfish, rich, cowardly Cisco couldn't be further from the Cisco that we all know and love, and that's part of Barry's journey is getting these people, who aren't necessarily the best version of themselves, to find their inner hero, which he knows is in there because he knows them from another time where they are heroes.
Closing quote

 
Despite Barry's seeming total alienation from all of his former friends, there's one person fans can count on to return to Barry, across time and space: Iris.

Opening quote
As Barry says in the episode, Iris is always Iris. So their relationship and their connection seems to be able to survive any changes to the timeline or any universe. There's always something between them.
Closing quote


One of the most shocking changes, however, may be Reverse-Flash. As fans might remember, Eobard Thawne (aka Reverse-Flash) was the director of S.T.A.R Labs and the time-travelling murderer who killed Nora Allen, Barry's mother. He's Barry's greatest enemy and a merciless killer, but in the altered timeline of Flashpoint, he's Barry's Jiminy Cricket:

Opening quote
Well, in a way, [Reverse-Flash] represents Barry's conscious, because Barry has messed with the universe to find his happy ending. He's put in the awkward, and ironic position of having his greatest villain, the man who killed his mother, being the one to tell him, "This is wrong, you're a hero and heroes don't do this." It's a great way to have him interact with his singular greatest foe by having the villain essentially be on the side of the angels and be right.
Closing quote


And that may be one of the central conflicts of the episode, if not the whole third season: doing the right thing with your powers. Barry's never been a bad guy, but like a phrase another superhero is fond of repeating (ad nauseum), with great power comes great responsibility. And Kreisberg hints that Barry may be tempted to abuse his power:

Opening quote
One of the themes [of the upcoming season] is what does it mean to have power and what you do with that power, and is power ultimately corrupting? That's definitely one of the themes that we're talking about.
Closing quote

We're all looking forward to the premiere of the new season of The Flash tonight and watching "Flashpoint" play out, but remember that the best may be yet to come. According to Kreisberg, the plans for a four-way crossover between Supergirl, Arrow, The Flash, and Legends of Tomorrow are in the works, and we already know the threat that's bringing them together.

T
he Flash returns tonight (Tuesday) at 8 PM ET on the CW.
Science Fiction
Comic Book TV Shows
DC Comics
The Flash