J.J. Abrams 'Star Trek' Reboot Prevented New Shows From Being Made

Wednesday, 23 August 2017 - 9:08PM
Sci-Fi TV Shows
Star Trek
Star Trek Discovery
No
Wednesday, 23 August 2017 - 9:08PM
J.J. Abrams 'Star Trek' Reboot Prevented New Shows From Being Made
Paramount
If you've ever wondered why Star Trek: Discovery wasn't made a decade ago, we now have an answer: it was J.J. Abrams' fault.

Okay, maybe not Abrams himself - but his reboot of James T. Kirk and Mr. Spock, simply titled Star Trek, was the reason why we haven't had any new Trek on television since the cancellation of Enterprise all the way back in 2005.

According to an article from Entertainment Weekly, the lack of Trek shows came primarily from an embargo placed upon CBS when the media juggernaut Viacom fractured in 2005, separating Paramount Pictures off into a separate entity no longer connected to the television network. Thus, Paramount had the rights to Star Trek movies, while CBS had the rights to Star Trek television.

But, providing the real kicker to fans everywhere, Paramount had priority in making a film, which led to a ban on new Star Trek television until six months after the third movie based on the Star Trek franchise. Star Trek Beyond came out in June 2016, meaning that the earliest CBS could get Star Trek: Discovery off the ground was January of this year - which isn't far off from their originally planned premiere date from the series, before delays kicked in.



As early as 2015, the wheels had started turning on a new show, and while significant delays have hampered progress, meaning that the show is only now coming to screens, it's interesting to note just how eager certain elements within CBS were to get this show into production the moment they were legally allowed to do so.

Certain voices within the upper echelons of CBS have been fairly derogatory of the merest idea of a big budget sci-fi show taking a primetime slot, so it had seemed as if maybe this was something that original showrunner Bryan Fuller was pushing in spite of a lack of interest within the company. This, apparently, isn't entirely the case - there's been some backlash, sure, but there must have been enough supporters of Discovery to greenlight it the moment it was feasible to do so from a legal perspective.

Perhaps the big question remaining, though, is how much the success of Abrams' Star Trek movie reboot will affect the tone and content of Discovery. Had we got a brand new show set in this universe back in 2005, just after Enterprise ended, it would no doubt have followed the same formula as traditional Trek, with politics and diplomacy leading stories.

Abrams made Star Trek a lot more like Star Wars; filled with space battles, explosions, and flawed characters that would rather punch each other than have a reasonable conversation. 

via GIPHY



There's no denying that those storytelling tweaks have pulled in new fans to the franchise, and from what footage we've seen, it looks like Discovery will take some cues from the Abramsverse in terms of action set pieces. Here's hoping, though, that in the twelve years in between Star Trek shows, CBS hasn't lost sight of the uplifting optimism that Gene Roddenberry's show is built around.

J.J. Abrams might not be directly responsible for the delays to Star Trek: Discovery, but if Seth MacFarlane's The Orville ends up being a better reflection of the original Star Trek's optimism than its official reimagining, fans will definitely know who to blame.
Science Fiction
Sci-Fi Movies
Sci-Fi TV Shows
Star Trek
Star Trek Discovery
No
No