The Original Roy Batty Actor Thinks the 'Blade Runner' Sequel Is Digging Its Own Grave

Friday, 22 September 2017 - 10:17AM
Blade Runner
Blade Runner 2049
Friday, 22 September 2017 - 10:17AM
The Original Roy Batty Actor Thinks the 'Blade Runner' Sequel Is Digging Its Own Grave
Image credit: Warner Bros.
Sequels, reboots, and remakes are a baked-in part of Hollywood at this point (there are apparently 124 remakes and reboots in the works now). As such, Blade Runner 2049 and a return to the replicant-filled world of Ridley Scott's original sci-fi masterpiece was inevitable. With a cult movie this revered, it was only a matter of time before we got to see what happened to Rick Deckard in the years since he discovered an origami unicorn waiting for him ran off with Rachel at the end of the first movie.

One person who's not entirely on board with the idea of a Blade Runner sequel is Rutger Hauer, who played the "villainous" Roy Batty in the first movie. To this day, his "tears in the rain" monologue is remembered as one of the most emotional moments, not just of the movie, but in all of science fiction.



As far as Hauer is concerned, the ambiguous conclusion of the first Blade Runner was perfect, and a sequel, while a flattering testament to the legacy of his performance, isn't exactly something that anyone actually needs. Said Hauer:

Opening quote
"It surprises me that they revisited it at all. It doesn't matter if it's right after or 10 years later… I don't know what that's about. I'll see the movie and see what it is. I think I know what [the story] is and I'll be surprised if it wasn't…and it would be probably a nice surprise!

...You can look at it as a complement [sic], but I still have a hard time [with it]. Do I need a complement [sic] like that? I don't think I do. It's a free market – people can do it if they buy the rights. But if something is really good, I would never try it, because it's like you're digging a hole for yourself, and why would you want to do that?"
Closing quote


Needless to say, Hauer's views are not echoed by the vast majority of Blade Runner fans. Most of the cult followers of the original film are eagerly anticipating another installment in the franchise, and have been won over by promotional materials for the film, with their beautiful visuals, haunting music, and impressive performances from a variety of talented modern actors (and also Jared Leto).

That said, Hauer may have a point. One of the things that made the original Blade Runner so unique was its appeal as a standalone pulp noir story that is deliberately vague and ambiguous about many elements of its narrative. The movie has plenty of room to breathe, with quiet, suspenseful moments punctuating the story to add intrigue and depth in much the same way that director Ridley Scott uses similar pregnant pauses (pun not intended) to fill his other seminal sci-fi work, Alien, with a feeling of dread.

Based on everything we've seen thus far, and Denis Villeneuve's enthusiasm for the project, this might actually be a rare case of a follow-up film that actually deserves to bear the name of the movie that came before.

Blade Runner 2049 hits US theaters on October 6th, 2017.
Science Fiction
Sci-Fi Movies
Blade Runner
Blade Runner 2049
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