Industrial Light & Magic Shows How They Recreated Classic 'Star Wars' Spaceships in a New VFX Reel

Thursday, 28 September 2017 - 11:20AM
Star Wars
Star Wars: Rogue One
Thursday, 28 September 2017 - 11:20AM
Industrial Light & Magic Shows How They Recreated Classic 'Star Wars' Spaceships in a New VFX Reel
Image credit: Industrial Light and Magic
Bringing dudes back from the dead is not something that movie studios can do yet, even with the kind of bank that Disney and Lucasfilm have. They can, however, build ultra-realistic 3-D models, and when it's time to do it on a grand scale, it's companies like Industrial Light & Magic's time to shine. A newly released VFX reel from George Lucas' company of wizards shows some of the work that went into making Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, including the scene with Peter Cushing.

Everyone knows that a lot of what we see on the screen is computer generated, but watching the full-length reel and seeing how ILM digitally layers terrain and complex structures (and how they completely recreated Grand Moff Tarkin's face so that he could sass Krennic) will give you a better appreciation for the insane level of detail they put into the film.



Industrial Light & Magic has been pushing the boundaries of visual effects and inventing new ones for over four decades now. The company's filmography is unmatched, with visual effects credits in every film from Star Wars and the upcoming Thor: Ragnarok to Twister and Titanic. Its trophy case is also overflowing, with dozens of Oscars and BAFTAs for films like Star Trek Into Darkness and Pacific Rim. But sometimes ILM still has to flex on people to show that their job is about more than pressing a few buttons on an iMac.

The Grand Moff Tarkin clip alone is worth the price of admission. Yes, when the film released in theaters some people bashed the CGI work and said that Tarkin looked weird, but others who didn't know that Peter Cushing had been dead for over 20 years didn't notice that there was another actor wearing his digital face for several minutes.

I would watch a 20-hour feature if it stopped every 10 seconds to show ILM at work. Someone get George on the line, he shouldn't be too busy these days.
Science Fiction
Sci-Fi Movies
Star Wars
Star Wars: Rogue One
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