'Blade Runner 2049' Almost Had Several More Bizarre Titles During Production

Saturday, 14 October 2017 - 4:46PM
Blade Runner
Blade Runner 2049
Saturday, 14 October 2017 - 4:46PM
'Blade Runner 2049' Almost Had Several More Bizarre Titles During Production
Warner Bros.
Blade Runner 2049 has been out in theaters for about a week now, and while it didn't bring in as much money as Warner Bros. might've hoped, it did fairly well with its $31.5 million opening weekend. And even more importantly (to fans, if not the studios), the reaction has been positive - you can check out our review for more.

It's hard to think that it might've attracted bigger audiences with a different title, especially considering the alternatives. Speaking to Monsters and Critics, Alcon Entertainment representative Andrew Kosove revealed a couple different potential titles and some working titles the movie went through, including one intended to be its final name - Blade Runner: Android's Dream. 

The first thing you might notice is how this title is more explicitly based on the source material for the original film, the 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? from sci-fi legend Philip K. Dick. The second thing you might notice is that, despite the novel's title working very well, as a movie title it sounds ridiculous. Android's Dream is corny, suggesting a feel-good movie about a robot Pinocchio pining to be a real boy, instead of the harsh detective story we got.

But Kosove seems fond of it nonetheless, only steering away from it because it goes into some potential spoiler territory. Kosove explained:

Opening quote
"I actually really like that title but with the benefit of hindsight, I'm very happy we ended up with the title we did because I think it's a little leading."
Closing quote


And Android's Dream isn't the weirdest potential title the movie almost received. When screenwriter Hampton Fancher (who's written very little besides the two Blade Runner movies) put together his first draft for the sequel, it was called Blade Runner: Acid Zoo, which does sounds pretty cool, but it might've been too weird of a name unless they planned to bring in Doctor Strange



From there, it was given the working title of Queensboro by fellow screenwriter Michael Green, to hide the fact that it was a Blade Runner sequel from fans - and because Kosovo is a New Yorker and was very fond of that local bridge. According to Green, speaking again to Monsters and Critics:

Opening quote
"For a while [Acid Zoo] was their working title. He doesn't know this, when I started working on it, the working title was 'Queensboro' because I always considered myself a New Yorker. I lived in Manhattan... I know Hampton lives in Brooklyn and I was on my way, had my laptop on my lap in a cab and I'm like 'all right, it's the bridge between the two'. So for a long time, the working title was Queensboro."
Closing quote


When fans discovered that it was a Blade Runner sequel anyway, the name was then changed to Triborough. And it seemed to take that name until everyone finally settled on the relatively simple name of Blade Runner 2049.

Blade Runner 2049 is a vague name, to be sure, and it could've easily been thrown together at the very end. But that certainly doesn't make it bad, and it accomplishes what it needs to. Fans of the original know it's a Blade Runner movie, and everyone else knows it's sci-fi because it clearly takes place in the year 2049. Like a replicant, it's not too flashy, but it's functional.
Science Fiction
Sci-Fi Movies
Blade Runner
Blade Runner 2049
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