The Infamous Game From 'Star Trek: The Next Generation' Is Recreated in AR

Monday, 13 November 2017 - 8:17PM
Star Trek
Monday, 13 November 2017 - 8:17PM
The Infamous Game From 'Star Trek: The Next Generation' Is Recreated in AR
YouTube/Robert Burke
If you remember the episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation entitled "The Game", then you're aware of how extremely dangerous "the game" was and that nobody should ever touch it. Anyway, somebody made a real life version of the game.

Of course, this version's simply an AR recreation for the Microsoft HoloLens and has no mind-controlling qualities (augmented reality tech simply isn't there yet), nor does it have any pleasure-inducing qualities beyond simply being fun. However, it does respond to your stress levels in a way that's harmless, but does fly a little dangerously close to the metaphorical sun.

Designed not too long ago by Robert Burke, the game is simple: the screen fills up with purple cones and red discs, and you have to guide the discs into the cones by relaxing. Burke also hooked it up to a Pip biosensor which can monitor your stress levels while you're holding it, and won't let you win if you're too tense. If that fails, shouting voice commands like "relax" will also do the trick. 

See it in action below:



In effect, this is a neat way to de-stress yourself, which makes it a departure from the game in The Next Generation. For those who aren't familiar with the episode, "The Game" followed an alien woman fooling Riker (surprise, surprise) into bringing an augmented reality game onboard the Enterprise, which caused a pleasure response in the brain every time you win.

It was also essentially a mind-control drug, which was highly addictive and scrambled the brains of anyone who played it, forcing them to show the game to more people until everyone aboard Enterprise except Wesley Crusher was infected. The whole thing was a commentary on addictive video games, and it made for a memorable 40 minutes, especially for a "Wesley" episode.

Burke wasn't particularly subtle in comparing the game to Pokemon GO, and even if the AR Pokemon game wasn't actually messing with your brain using dopamine or mind-control, the massive player base certainly spent much of 2016 acting like it was. In that sense, this was just another of the many ways Star Trek managed to predict the future.

So while this game may not be as useful as the augmented reality Minority Report interface that's also in the works, it's a fun way for fans to relive one of the show's more disturbing episodes.
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