The Original Ending to Interstellar Was Incredibly Depressing, But Made a Lot More Sense

Friday, 20 March 2015 - 9:47AM
Interstellar
Friday, 20 March 2015 - 9:47AM
The Original Ending to Interstellar Was Incredibly Depressing, But Made a Lot More Sense
If you experienced Interstellar the same way we did, you were watching a heady, well-acted, perfectly serviceable science fiction movie until it fell apart spectacularly in the last act and suddenly made no goddamn sense. As it turns out, writer Jonathan Nolan's scripted ending was much more logical (and upsetting), but director Christopher Nolan got his hands on it, and here we are.

At the end of Interstellar (spoiler!), Matthew McConaughey's character travels through a black hole (which is already fairly ridiculous) and finds himself in a fifth-dimensional plane called the Tesseract in which time appears as a spatial dimension, and which just so happens to be behind his daughter's bookshelf (seriously). He then realizes that future humans have constructed both the wormhole and the Tesseract in order to allow him to travel through time and communicate the data necessary to save humanity to his daughter. Then, the tesseract dissolves, and he travels to the near future in which he reunites with his now-elderly daughter, who has, in fact, saved the human race.

At a recent media event promoting the Blu-Ray release of Interstellar, Jonathan Nolan was asked what the heck happened at the end of Interstellar. At first, he wryly replied, "You've got the wrong brother," but then admitted that the original ending he wrote "had the Einstein-Rosen bridge [colloquially, a wormhole] collapse when Cooper tries to send the data back."

He didn't elaborate on exactly what that would mean for the ending, but there are essentially two options. Either the data made it back to Earth before the wormhole collapsed or it didn't, but either way there would be no fifth dimensional bookshelf. This would make the film make a lot more sense (not to mention jettison that whole "love is the key to the universe" nonsense), but it would also mean that McConaughey would be unable to travel through time, reunite with his daughter, or meet up with Anne Hathaway. If I had to guess, I would say that the data made it back, as it would be way too bleak if Cooper died and failed to save the human race. But our protagonist probably would have been pulled apart in the singularity of the black hole, sacrificing himself for the sake of humanity. If you ask me, it's a shame that they changed it. Christopher's ending was visually striking, but the writing was incredibly contrived, while Jonathan's sounds like it would have been much more powerful.

Via Nerdist
Science Fiction
Sci-Fi Movies
Interstellar