Peter Capaldi Sings Happy Birthday to New Doctor Who for Tenth Anniversary of 'Rose'

Thursday, 26 March 2015 - 3:48PM
Doctor Who
Thursday, 26 March 2015 - 3:48PM
Peter Capaldi Sings Happy Birthday to New Doctor Who for Tenth Anniversary of 'Rose'
Happy birthday, Doctor Who! Ten years ago today, BBC introduced Doctor Who to the new millennium for the first time with the iconic episode, "Rose," which introduced Christopher Eccleston's Ninth Doctor and the beloved companion Rose Tyler. To celebrate a decade of the new Doctor Who, Peter Capaldi surprised fans at Doctor Who Experience by singing "Happy Birthday," cutting the cake, and generally being adorable:



Since it returned to television in 2005, Doctor Who has had an immeasurable impact on geek and popular culture, spawning a passionate fandom and making the word "Tardis" part of the public consciousness. To see where it all began, watch the clip below, which shows Christopher Eccleston's first scene as the Ninth Doctor:



And, for the sake of nostalgia, here are some reviews of "Rose," where all but the last came out contemporaneously with the episode:

"The superb 'Doctor Who' achieves something difficult for American shows: It makes TV look easy by demonstrating that intelligence and escapism are not mortal enemies." - Seattle Times

"As a fan I really hope this new series succeeds. It's lively, well filmed and the special effects are up to scratch. There is humour, a vital ingredient if the new series is to be a success." - Daily Mail

"The center of the piece though has to be the lead actors. Christopher Eccleston takes to the role with a light touch with the serious side bubbling under the surface and it seemed very much to me along the lines of the late great Patrick Troughton's approach. The real revelation though was Billie Piper as the trusty new assistant. From the looks of this she'll be capable of far more than being Head of Screaming and it was a nice touch in the opener that it's her and not the Doctor that manages to overcome the alien invaders." - Digital Spy

"If the program was inquisitive science fiction in 1963 and an alien invasion thriller in 1970, then in 2005 it must be considered a character drama. The goal here is for the audience to understand and empathize with Rose Tyler, to care more about the young woman with no A-levels, no job, and no future... than the alien genius with the time machine... For the first time in 27 seasons, it's the Doctor who is the glorified plot device, primarily there to make the companion look clever." - AV Club
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