Wonder Woman Writer Criticizes Warner Bros's Cinematic Version of the Character

Friday, 17 July 2015 - 10:22AM
DC Comics
Wonder Woman
Friday, 17 July 2015 - 10:22AM
Wonder Woman Writer Criticizes Warner Bros's Cinematic Version of the Character
We've only seen about ten seconds of footage of Gal Godot's Wonder Woman so far, but as is often the case in the geek community, it's never too early to form an opinion. Grant Morrison, a DC Comics writer who is currently in the process of writing the character, insists that the cinematic version of Wonder Woman misses the point, and portrays her as a "warrior woman" rather than an antidote to "blood-curdling masculinity."

Morrison is the writer behind Wonder Woman: Earth One, an upcoming graphic novel that aims to reintroduce Wonder Woman to modern readers. According to a recent interview with Nerdist, Gal Godot's version is a violent warrior, while Diana was intended to be a peaceful peaceful character, and that's how he plans to portray her in his graphic novel:

Opening quote
I sat down and I thought, "I don't want to do this warrior woman thing." I can understand why they're doing it, I get all that, but that's not what [Wonder Woman creator] William Marston wanted, that's not what he wanted at all! His original concept for Wonder Woman was an answer to comics that he thought were filled with images of blood-curdling masculinity, and you see the latest shots of Gal Gadot in the costume, and it's all sword and shield and her snarling at the camera. Marston's Diana was a doctor, a healer, a scientist. So I went back to those roots and just built it up again.

What would a society of immortal women that's been around for 7,000 years have done? They wouldn't still be chopping men's head's off; they've got art and architecture and philosophy and poetry and it's got nothing to do with men...

And for the first 48 pages, there are no men - it's just women talking to each other. And then halfway through the book, we're building up to this big fight, and then I thought, "No, I'm not." This book isn't about fights, there's not going to be any fights. So we threw out the rules of traditional boy's adventure fiction. It's the most exciting book I've done in years, it changed everything I'm thinking about the future.
Closing quote


As a feminist, I'm torn about this. Aside from the fact that he's making assumptions about the overall impression of the character from just a few seconds of footage, his statements seem well-intentioned but problematic. He seems to be taking the stance that Wonder Woman is meant to celebrate the positive aspects of femininity over masculinity, where women are apparently more nurturing, pacifistic, and artistic than men.

While I agree that these are all positive traits, and that a civilization that is more advanced would hopefully value these traits more than modern-day society does, it's not relevant to masculinity versus femininity. There should be some comic book characters that are violent, and some that are peaceful, regardless of gender, just as there are peaceful and violent people of both genders in real life.

I think it's commendable to write comics that don't depend on traditional narratives, but it's not a traditional "boy" narrative, it's just a traditional adventure narrative. Didn't he ever watch Hunger Games, or Divergent, or Buffy the Vampire Slayer, for that matter? There's nothing wrong with "warrior women," and the fact that Diana is a woman doesn't mean that Warner Bros. should eschew a traditional superhero narrative, at least not for that reason.

Although, if it makes Morrison feel any better, they're probably going to water down the action parts of the Wonder Woman solo movie, if the dismissal of Michelle MacLaren is any indication

Warner Bros. Wonder Woman will first be seen in Batman v Superman on March 25, 2016, while the Wonder Woman solo movie is slated for a 2017 release.
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