The Observable Universe is 320 Million Light-Years Smaller Than We Previously Believed

Saturday, 27 August 2016 - 4:06PM
Astrophysics
Astronomy
Saturday, 27 August 2016 - 4:06PM
The Observable Universe is 320 Million Light-Years Smaller Than We Previously Believed
The Planck satellite has recently gathered data that has led to some new calculations regarding the size of the observable universe. Based on the information gathered by the Planck satellite, scientists are now saying that the observable universe is actually smaller than previously believed.

The new calculation gives the universe a radius of 45.34 billion light-years, a 320 million light-year decrease since the last calculation in 2003. While that number might seem big, 320 million light-years is barely a drop in the bucket compared to a 45.34 billion light-year universe. So while this is unlikely to be some revolutionary breakthrough in science, it does help to arrive at a more accurate understanding of the size of the observable universe.

Scientists calculate the size of the observable universe by using an equation with a number of factors, such as an event known as 'the recombination," the rate of expansion of the universe, and several other things as well. While the original calculation was actually quite close (our new calculations show the new calculation to be only .7% smaller), the Planck satellite's data collection has given scientists even greater insight into the matter and a reason to revise their calculation to a more accurate number.

This new study that has seemingly revised the calculations of the size of the observable universe will be published in an upcoming issue of Advances in Astrophysics.
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Space
Astrophysics
Astronomy

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