Top 5 Science Videos From This Week: Bill Nye, Black Holes, and Robots

Friday, 21 April 2017 - 1:43PM
Space
Physics
Robotics
Friday, 21 April 2017 - 1:43PM
Top 5 Science Videos From This Week: Bill Nye, Black Holes, and Robots
Image credit: Wired
Let's be honest here: science is always better in video form. Whether it's watching a glowing nuclear reactor or checking out a fan-made, 3D-printed BB-8 droid, science is best appreciated when you can see it in action (from a safe distance). In the words of Cave Johnson, the enterprising mind behind Aperture Science, "Science isn't about why—it's about why not! Why is so much of our science dangerous? Why not marry safe science if you love it so much?"

With that, here are our top 5 science videos from the past week!

Watch a Computer Simulation of a Supernova


Aside from black holes, supernovas are at the top of most people's lists when they think of "giant, destructive space cataclysms." They're so powerful that a red nova happening in 2022 may change the night sky forever. Either way, supernovas are the gold standard when it comes to kick-ass explosions, and if he could, we know Michael Bay would try to use one in a Transformers movie. If he did, it would probably look like this:


Brick-Laying Robot


There's something oddly satisfying about watching this robot carefully mortar and place each brick perfectly in line. Maybe it's the precision of it, or maybe it's the real-life equivalent of building a house in Minecraft. It's very calming, despite the fact that it's even more evidence that robots will soon be replacing another human job.


Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Dark Matter


When scientists say 85% of all the matter in the universe is unaccounted for, most people don't understand what that means. It's actually one of the greatest mysteries in astronomy and physics: if the universe was really made up of only baryonic matter, ie, protons, electrons, neutrons, then it would have flown apart or collapsed a long time ago. There's something keeping the universe, stars, and galaxies stable, but we don't know what it is. Here's the rundown:


Apollo 16 Lands on the Moon


Yesterday was the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 16 Moon landing, which would be the second-to-last time humans every set foot on the Moon. Even though going to the Moon is now considered 'just a thing that happened', it's still incredible to think that NASA was able to safely put humans on a rock orbiting the Earth at 2,288 miles per hour, then bring them back safely. Then do it again, and again, and again.


Bill Nye Answers Twitter Questions, Including Why There Are Still Monkeys


For almost a decade, Bill Nye sat in Science Guy retirement. But as soon as he thought he was out, it pulled him back in. With his new show, Bill Nye Saves the World out today on Netflix (complete with an intro song by Tyler the Creator), Bill's taking the gloves off and spitting mad science at fans and foes alike with a good dose of humor. Watch him answer some science questions from fans below, including the infamous "If humans evolved from monkeys, why are there still monkeys?":
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