Check Out HEXA, a Programmable Spider-Droid with Night Vision

Wednesday, 16 August 2017 - 10:12AM
Technology
Gadgets
Weird Science
Wednesday, 16 August 2017 - 10:12AM
Check Out HEXA, a Programmable Spider-Droid with Night Vision
Image credit: Vincross
Would you like an adorable pet robot that you can program yourself to help you perform a variety of household activities? Before you answer that question, bear in mind: the robot in question looks like a cross between iRobot's Sonny and a giant tarantula. If you're okay with becoming a Spider-Man villain without the tragic backstory, then the HEXA might be for you. HEXA will retail at just shy of $600, and is designed to give laypeople without any coding experience a fundamental first step into understanding and making use of the increasingly promising field of robotics.

Conceived as an "all-terrain robot for the real world", HEXA's small, multi-limbed design may look a little off-putting for those who don't instantly find it strangely cute, but its appearance is a case of arachnophobia fears taking a back seat to the more important element of functionality. Six little multi-jointed legs (yes, a real spider has eight legs, but this is close enough to resemble the real deal) allow HEXA a fantastic range of flexibility, so it's able to scale obstacles, negotiate tight spaces, and move around with ease in any environment—albeit a little slowly at times.



As cool as this design might be, where HEXA really shines is in its coding—the developer kit that's included with the robot is designed so that users with limited coding experience can create simple but effective programming commands for their HEXA, teaching their robot spider pet new tricks with ease and allowing for the machine to be customized to perform various tasks required by its owner.

There's a lot of potential here—HEXA could be the first step towards home help robots, as it can potentially be programmed to act as an assistant to elderly or otherwise disabled users who simply need a little extra support around home. Sadly, HEXA isn't really built to be able to pick up and carry items (unlike some other robots and drones that are in development), limiting its functionality in this respect, but it's worth assuming that enterprising users will be able to come up with useful ways of taking advantage of the robot nonetheless—like training it to spring at people like Half Life's headcrabs.

You can check out more on HEXA at Vincross' website.
Science
Science News
Technology
Gadgets
Weird Science
No