Adam Savage's 'Tested' Shows Off Their New 3-D Printed Lightsaber Hilt

Friday, 08 September 2017 - 10:15AM
Technology
Gadgets
Friday, 08 September 2017 - 10:15AM
Adam Savage's 'Tested' Shows Off Their New 3-D Printed Lightsaber Hilt
Image credit: Tested
As any student of the Force knows, building a lightsaber is key to a Jedi's training. While the process of carefully placing a kyber crystal within the heart of the weapon can be difficult, the job has now become a lot simpler, as Tested has provided the world with a template for a "lightsaber-inspired laser sword hilt" (no copyright or trademark infringement here, no sir!) that 3D printer owners can easily download and print out for their own amusement.



Created by Star Wars fan and Tested teammate Sean Charlesworth, the laser sword is designed to mimic the shape and feel of Luke Skywalker's blade from Return of the Jedi (itself identical to Obi-Wan's lightsaber in A New Hope), but the design itself is completely original. Sean used old camera parts as the basis for some elements of his lightsaber's design, and even included a detachable outer casing so that the hilt's cross-section can be revealed, showing a glowing red plastic "crystal" within.

The aim here was not to make a hero's lightsaber, however—the pointy black design is intended for anyone who'd like to cosplay as a Sith, with Sean hoping that the finished product will feel imposing and deadly in its own right, even without a glowing laser shooting out of the top.

It's fun to think where 3D printing will take toys over the next few years—it's already possible to 3D-print Lego-compatible bricks at home, since the popular construction toy's unique design has long since become public domain. As 3D printers become more commonplace, it'll be increasingly common for action figures, custom video game console cases, and even models of the Moon to be available to anyone with a solid internet connection.

This isn't to say that there won't be money to be made from toys in the future—instead of selling physical figures, companies could sell templates to print officially licensed products at home, or else cut down on shipping costs by having stores print and assemble toys locally (especially if they can start using bathroom waste as a printer material). What's more, if the music industry's recent vinyl revival is anything to go by, we may see a new interest in hand-carved wooden toys, like the ones from Nova Natural.

Either way, we may be moving toward a future where matter duplicators stop being sci-fi and start undermining economies. In the meantime, though, we'll be practicing with our new laser sword hilts and listening to "Duel of the Fates" on repeat.

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