Ancient Man Used Alien Weapons, Says New Study

Tuesday, 05 December 2017 - 11:18AM
Technology
Tuesday, 05 December 2017 - 11:18AM
Ancient Man Used Alien Weapons, Says New Study
Image credit: Pixabay
Bronze Age iron tools used by ancient humans may be extraterrestrial in origin, according to a fascinating new study.
 
Bronze Age tools likely weren't simply smelted—they more than likely landed as meteorites on Earth, giving people of that time a metallic boost in their choice of tool-making options, researcher Albert Jambon announced in a study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.
 
It's not that iron wasn't around, and that the human race was simply lucky enough to have it plummet from the heavens, iron is one of Earth's more common elements. However, using it as a metal for object-making requires smelting, and a number of recorded iron artifacts from the time period—such as King Tutankhamun's dagger—predate the time when mankind was known to have such technology.

via GIPHY

 
Jambon looked at jewelry, weapons and other relics that date between 3200 BCE-1350 BCE, taken from cultures of those times in the Middle East and Asia. Using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to determine elemental composition, he found that the antiquities he examined were probably in fact not forged with smelted iron, but instead from meteorite iron.
 
The determination between space iron and local iron is made by the nickel content. Iron from the Earth's surface is mostly nickel-free, but meteorites—which can be formed from subsurface rock when freed from extraterrestrial objects—can have high nickel content, a good sign of offworld origin.
However, Jambon doesn't completely challenge what has been previously considered iron tools created by ancient casting, but instead suggests a deeper analysis should be used in the determination. 
 
"The few iron objects from the Bronze Age sensu stricto that could be analyzed are definitely made of meteoritic iron, suggesting that speculations about precocious smelting during the Bronze Age should be revised," he writes.

"It opens the possibility of tracking when and where the first smelting operations happened, the threshold of a new era. It emphasizes the importance of analytical methods for properly studying the evolution of the use of metals and metalworking technologies in our past cultures."




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Ancient Man Used Alien Weapons, Says New Study
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