Is This Unidentified Cosmic String In Milky Way Actually a Star Gate?

Friday, 22 December 2017 - 10:04AM
Astrophysics
Astronomy
Friday, 22 December 2017 - 10:04AM
Is This Unidentified Cosmic String In Milky Way Actually a Star Gate?
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Image Credit: NSF/VLA/UCLA/M. Morris et al. via Harvard
Last year, scientists discovered a mysterious, snake-like filament was probing a giant black hole at the center of our galaxy. Now the filament, which is about 2.3 light-years long and curves around to point at the Sagittarius A black hole, has been captured in stunning high-resolution images that might finally offer researchers some tangible clues for figuring out if this string acts as a bridge to another universe.

via GIPHY


"With our improved image, we can now follow this filament much closer to the Galaxy's central black hole, and it is now close enough to indicate to us that it must originate there," said Mark Morris of UCLA, who led the study. "However, we still have more work to do to find out what the true nature of this filament is."

cosmic string harvard

(A radio image from the NSF's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array showing the center of our galaxy. The mysterious radio filament is the curved line located near the center of the image, & the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), is shown by the bright source near the bottom of the image.

NSF/VLA/UCLA/M. Morris et al.)

That work has led to three potential explanations that offer as to what the filament could be. One theory suggests that the string and the black hole have no correlation and that its presence at the center of Sagittarius A is just a coincidence. The second theory suggests that it was formed from high-speed particles that were repelled from the supermassive black hole. When a spinning black hole is met with gas spiraling inwards, the combination can produce a magnetic field that approaches or even threads the event horizon, a point of no return. Within this towering magnetic fields, particles would speed up and away while spiraling around the field.

via GIPHY


The third theory is most intriguing, though- what if the filament is a cosmic string? These theoretical, never before observed objects are long, extremely thin formations possessing both mass and an electric current. Theorists had previously predicted that cosmic strings would migrate to the centers of galaxies if they existed, and the placement of this filament suggests they may be right. "Part of the thrill of science is stumbling across a mystery that is not easy to solve," said co-author Jun-Hui Zhao of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "While we don't have the answer yet, the path to finding it is fascinating." If the third theory turns out to be true, this cosmic string would have profound implications on our understanding of gravity, space-time and what lies beyond our known universe.
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UCLA and Harvard Scientists Ponder Cosmic 'Filament' in Milky Way
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