Watch a Time-Lapse of the SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Launch

Wednesday, 27 December 2017 - 7:13PM
SpaceX
Wednesday, 27 December 2017 - 7:13PM
Watch a Time-Lapse of the SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Launch
Vimeo/Jesse Watson

Last week, SpaceX appeared in headlines and all over social media when they launched their Falcon 9 rocket over southern California. What looked like a possible UFO thanks to the unusual trail it left behind was actually just a fancy rocket, but it did make for an impressive sight.

If you missed the launch the first time around, because you don't live near the West Coast or because you were looking down, the spectacle was captured on camera several times over, including by photographer Jesse Watson. Using a Nikon D810 and wide angle lens, Watson put together an extremely high quality time-lapse of the flying Falcon 9.

Check out the video below:


SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Launch from Jesse Watson on Vimeo.



Shooting from Yuma, Arizona, Watson says he shot about 2452 images in the moments he could see the rocket passing through the sky, and edited it down to a simple 1315 images that went into the final time-lapse above.

The Falcon 9 may have launched about 400 miles away from Yuma at the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, but it's still fairly clear in the night sky. In fact, it still manages to fill up quite a large chunk of the horizon. SpaceX's crown jewel is nothing to scoff at — unless you think it's aliens instead of Elon Musk, a conspiracy theory that Musk was pretty amused by:




This was far from the first test of the Falcon 9, as grandiose as this recent test was. In fact, the biggest draw of the rocket is that it's reusable — unlike past rockets, SpaceX is designing spacecrafts which can survive multiple journeys, and then be recycled for the next mission.

It's something NASA has shown a lot of interest in, agreeing to let SpaceX send the rockets to and from the International Space Station to deliver supplies to the astronauts there. That's been going smoothly since SpaceX tried it for the first time earlier this month, as they delivered cargo like beer and Star Wars patches via recycled rocket.

And the Falcon 9's got nothing on the enormous Falcon Heavy rocket that SpaceX is constructing. The day that launches, it should be just as crazy of a sight for anyone watching the sky.

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