6,000-Year-Old Pre-Viking Artifacts Discovered in Norway as Climate Change Melts Glaciers

Wednesday, 24 January 2018 - 10:01AM
Science News
Wednesday, 24 January 2018 - 10:01AM
6,000-Year-Old Pre-Viking Artifacts Discovered in Norway as Climate Change Melts Glaciers
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"Thus it is possible to evaluate the relationship between the chronology of ice-patch finds and key thresholds," the study says. "These include both environmental turning points such as the onset of mid-Holocene neoglaciation, the Late Antique Little Ice Age and the Little Ice Age—and episodes of cultural transformation such as the spread of permanent agricultural settlement and the growth of long range intra- and inter-regional trade which may have reached an apogee during the Viking Age."



The study concludes that the 153 radiocarbon dates of the artifacts found highlight "the importance of an increasingly threatened source of archaeological and palaeoenvironmental evidence."



"If something fragile like textile melts out, dries and is windblown it might be lost to science very quickly," study co-author archaeologist James Barrett told Ars Technica. "Or an arrow might be exposed and then covered again by the next snow, within a few weeks, and remain well-preserved."



"Fieldwork is hard work—hiking with all our equipment, often camping on permafrost-but very rewarding. [You're] rescuing the archaeology, bringing the melting ice to wider attention, discovering a unique environmental history and really connecting with the natural environment." 


The effects of our increasingly warming planet can be felt elsewhere, too. It was recently reported that climate change is causing 99 percent of Australian sea turtles born to be female. Scientists also believe that climate change will cause volcanic eruptions to steadily increase.

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