Juno Probe's 11th Flyby of Jupiter Leads to More Amazing Photos

Saturday, 10 February 2018 - 2:03PM
Space
Solar System
NASA
Saturday, 10 February 2018 - 2:03PM
Juno Probe's 11th Flyby of Jupiter Leads to More Amazing Photos
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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill
NASA's Juno probe has been orbiting Jupiter for just over a year and a half since its arrival in July 2016, giving us some of the best images of the gas giant we've ever seen. And it's still going.

This week, the probe completed its 11th flyby around Jupiter, which means another large heap of raw data and images were just beamed back to Earth. It was technically its 10th flyby for scientific purposes, but it's been gradually getting closet to the planet's surface during its orbits, and this time it came within 2,100 miles (3,500 kilometers) of the top of Jupiter's clouds.

But most of the images Juno sends back aren't so fancy on their own, being fragments and snippets of the planet. The best work comes from the citizen scientists who've grown accustomed to creating more striking images of the planet using the raw data, pulled from the official JunoCam website that gets updated every 53 days or so.




It's an impressive community effort that's been built up around Juno, who's becoming one of the more popular probes in our solar system since the Cassini probe destroyed itself in Saturn last year. Everyone's always known about Jupiter's Red Spot, but thanks to Juno's flybys, we're learning how amazing its north poles and other Van Gogh-like features of its stormy surface look close up.

You can see some examples below, and a larger gallery of those citizen-created images here.









Juno is there for plenty more than cool photos, of course. It's also measuring a multitude of different factors like the amount of water in Jupiter's atmosphere, its magnetic fields and gravity fields, and details surrounding its magnetosphere and the resulting auroras that produces.

Much like Cassini, Juno's journey is set to end eventually when it crashes into Jupiter's surface. It's unclear when that will be, but it'll last at least through its next flyby in a couple months before its status is reevaluated.


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