NASA Releases a Striking Time-Lapse of Jupiter's South Pole

Friday, 23 February 2018 - 5:08PM
Space
Solar System
NASA
Friday, 23 February 2018 - 5:08PM
NASA Releases a Striking Time-Lapse of Jupiter's South Pole
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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstadt
It's been a little while since NASA's Juno probe has sent back some amazing looking photos of Jupiter, but the probe is still out there.

And a cool new photo has finally arrived. Several, in fact, as NASA just released a time-lapse of Jupiter's often unseen south pole draped in shadow. There's been some color enhancement, and like many photos from Juno, the image was compiled by citizen scientists (in this case, Gerald Eichstädt) after the raw data was posted to NASA's JunoCam website.

Check it out below:




The photos were taken during Juno's eleventh flyby of the gas giant, and were all snapped during a forty minute period when the probe was directly over the south pole (or "under" it, but directions like that don't work in space). 

Juno was between 85,292 - 124,856 miles (137,264 - 200,937 kilometers) over the top of Jupiter's clouds at the time, enough to make the largest planet in our solar system still look small.



As mentioned earlier, part of the really cool thing about Juno is how much raw data is released directly to the public, allowing space enthusiasts to compile it into some of the most impressive images of the planet we've seen yet. While everyone mostly thinks of Jupiter as a planet with just a Great Red Spot (which might not last for much longer anyways), the rest of the swirling gasses covering the planet look much like a Vincent Van Gogh painting.

So as always, keep an eye out for more cool Jupiter photos. There's sure to be a lot more of them.
Science
Space Imagery
Space
Solar System
NASA
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