Rose-Colored Jupiter Storm is More Dangerous Than It Looks

Sunday, 18 March 2018 - 2:17PM
Space
Solar System
Sunday, 18 March 2018 - 2:17PM
Rose-Colored Jupiter Storm is More Dangerous Than It Looks
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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Matt Brealey/Gustavo B C
As NASA's Juno probe continues to circle around Jupiter, we continue to get amazing shots of the many storms on the gas giant's surface besides its shrinking Great Red Spot. 

For example, the most recent photo was taken by Juno while it was 7,578 miles (12,195 kilometers) over the tops of Jupiter's clouds, and shows a close-up of a bright storm swirling around in the planet's northern hemisphere. Its colors were adjusted to make it easier to see, giving the whole picture a rose-colored quality. It's still an extremely massive storm, however.

See it below:




Like most of the amazing Jupiter photos we've been seeing over the past few months, it was put together by citizen scientists using raw data from the Juno probe, which is uploaded to an official JunoCam website run by NASA. Jupiter is a colorful enough planet that we usually get some visually arresting photos, but this one perhaps allows for a better view of the storm without all the colors as a distraction.

NASA has been looking to citizen scientists rather frequently as of late, beyond simply photos from Juno. They've recently looked to hobbyists to help them identify a mysterious new type of aurora by matching it with satellite readings from the European Space Agency. Beyond that, they also need similar help from anybody with a camera to take photos of clouds for them, to match that data up with satellites.

But this is by far the most impressive work from amateur scientists, who've been continuously examining new data and photos of Jupiter and creating these impressive images.

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